How Do You Know If Your Child Might Have a Learning Disability?

English: A child studying

English: A child studying (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How Do You Know If Your Child Might Have a Learning Disability?
By: Larry B. Silver, M.D. (2008)
Many of the questions I receive from parents describe their child’s learning problems and then ask if he or she might have a Learning Disability (LD). I receive similar questions about Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). These are two separate and very different problems. Students with ADHD might show hyperactive/fidgety behaviors, inattention/distractibility problems, and/or impulsivity. These behaviors, present for years, can be seen at school, at home, and with peers. Students with LD have a neurologically-based processing problem that interferes with the ability to master specific learning skills. Between 30 and 50 percent of children with LD will also have ADHD. The reverse is also true, between 30 and 50 percent of children with ADHD will also have LD. So, it is wise to look for both possibilities.
So, how would you know to suspect that your child or adolescent has a learning disability?
Students with LD have difficulty processing information in one or more of several areas of learning. They may have problems getting information into the brain (called an input problem). They may have difficulty with sound input (called an auditory perception or auditory processing disorder) or with visual input (called a visual perception disorder). This student may have difficulty integrating information once it is received in the brain. These problems may include the ability to sequence information, to infer meaning (abstract), or to organize information. Some may have problems with the storage and retrieval of information or memory. The memory problem might involve information still in the process of being learned (often called working memory or short-term memory) or material that has been learned but not retained (long-term memory).
Finally, students may have difficulty getting information out of the brain (called an output problem). This problem may impact the ability to send information to their muscles. For example, a student with this problem may have difficulty coordinating the muscles of the hand and have slow, tedious and awkward handwriting (called a grapho-motor problem). Additionally, this student may have difficulty getting thoughts onto paper (reflected by problems with spelling, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, or organization of the thoughts). Students also may have difficulty with language output, including problems organizing their thoughts, finding the right words, and expressing themselves.
There is no one definitive characteristic found in a child or adolescent with learning disabilities. The student may show characteristics of one or more of the areas described. In fact, it is very uncommon to have only one area of difficulty. Also, how a learning disability manifests in school is based on the student’s grade level and the demands for that grade level.
What are the clues of a learning disability?
In preschoolers, look for:

Communication delays, such as slow language development or difficulty with speech. Problems understanding what is being said or problems communicating thoughts.
Poor coordination and uneven motor development, such as delays in learning to sit, walk, color, and using scissors. Later watch for problems forming letters and numbers.
Problems with memory and routine; for example, not remembering specifics of daily activities and not understanding instructions. Possibly, problems remembering multiple instructions.
Delays in socialization including playing and relating interactively with other children.
In elementary school, look for:

Problems learning phonemes (individual units of sound) and graphemes (letters, numbers). Problems learning how to blend sounds and letters to sound out words. Problems remembering familiar words by sight. Later, difficulty with reading comprehension.
Problems forming letters and numbers. Later, problems with basic spelling and grammar.
Difficulties learning math skills and doing math calculations.
Difficulty with remembering facts.
Difficulty organizing materials (notebook, binder, papers), information, and/or concepts.
Not understanding oral instructions and an inability to express oneself verbally. Some types of LD are not apparent until middle school or high school. With increased responsibilities and more complex work, new areas of weakness may become apparent.
Losing or forgetting materials, or doing work and forgetting to turn it into the teacher.
An inability to plan out the steps and time lines for completing projects, especially long-term projects.
Difficulty organizing thoughts for written reports or public speaking.
If you see these clues and believe your pre-school or elementary-school aged son or daughter might have LD, contact the principal of your child’s public school and request a meeting to discuss having your child evaluated for learning disabilities. If your child is in a private school, you are entitled to an evaluation at the public school your child would have attended.
The diagnostic process is called a “psycho-educational” evaluation. Today, schools use a “response to intervention” model in which students are exposed to scientific, research-based instruction and their responses are monitored. If they do not respond, they are considered for special education. More information on response to intervention is available in the article Response to Intervention (RTI): A Primer for Parents.
Under education law, public schools must provide this evaluation if requested to do so and when problems are apparent. This is true if the child is in private school as well. As a taxpayer you can go to your public school to request such an assessment. There are three parts to this evaluation:
An assessment of potential, usually done through an IQ test.
A battery of achievement tests to assess skills in reading, writing, and math.
A battery of tests to assess processing skills. These tests examine possible problems with input, integration, and output of information.
The results of these tests should clarify if the student has a learning disability. Identifying processing problems may not qualify the student for services. Most school systems use what is called a “discrepancy formula” to decide if an individual is eligible for services. That is, there must be a specific degree of difference between the student potential (IQ) and performance. Your son or daughter might have significant processing problems but not be far enough behind to qualify for services. This is the reason that many schools will not identify a child with LD until third grade or later. For more information on obtaining an evaluation for learning disabilities, please read What Do You Do If You Suspect Your Child Has a Learning Disability.
For more information, contact the Learning Disabilities Association of America.
The author Dr. Larry Silver answers questions from readers in Ask Dr. Silver
Silver, L. (2008). How Do You Know If Your Child Might Have a Learning Disability?

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Social and Emotional Problems Related to Dyslexia

Dyslexia Fence

Dyslexia Fence (Photo credit: The Nikon Guru)

Social and Emotional Problems Related to Dyslexia
By: Michael Ryan, M.D. and International Dyslexia Association (2004)
Do emotional disorders cause dyslexia?
Research indicates that dyslexia is caused by biological factors not emotional or family problems. Samuel T. Orton, M.D. was one of the first researchers to describe the emotional aspects of dyslexia. According to his research, the majority of dyslexic preschoolers are happy and well adjusted. Their emotional problems begin to develop when early reading instruction does not match their learning style. Over the years, the frustration mounts as classmates surpass the dyslexic student in reading skills. Recent research funded by the National Institute of Health has identified many of the neurological and cognitive differences that contribute to dyslexia. The vast majority of these factors appear to be caused by genetics rather than poor parenting or childhood depression or anxiety.
Why is dyslexia discouraging and frustrating?
The frustration of children with dyslexia often centers on their inability to meet expectations. Their parents and teachers see a bright, enthusiastic child who is not learning to read and write. Time and again, dyslexics and their parents hear, “He’s such a bright child; if only he would try harder.” Ironically, no one knows exactly how hard the dyslexic is trying.
The pain of failing to meet other people’s expectations is surpassed only by dyslexics’ inability to achieve their goals. This is particularly true of those who develop perfectionistic expectations in order to deal with their anxiety. They grow up believing that it is “terrible” to make a mistake.
However, their learning disability, almost by definition means that these children will make many “careless” or “stupid” mistakes. This is extremely frustrating to them, as it makes them feel chronically inadequate.
The dyslexic frequently has problems with social relationships. These can be traced to causes:
Dyslexic children may be physically and socially immature in comparison to their peers. This can lead to a poor self-image and less peer acceptance.
Dyslexics’ social immaturity may make them awkward in social situations.
Many dyslexics have difficulty reading social cues. They may be oblivious to the amount of personal distance necessary in social interactions or insensitive to other people’s body language.
Dyslexia often affects oral language functioning. Affected persons may have trouble finding the right words, may stammer, or may pause before answering direct questions. This puts them at a disadvantage as they enter adolescence, when language becomes more central to their relationships with peers.
My clinical observations lead me to believe that, just as dyslexics have difficulty remembering the sequence of letters or words, they may also have difficulty remembering the order of events. For example, let us look at a normal playground interaction between two children. A dyslexic child takes a toy that belongs to another child, who calls the dyslexic a name. The dyslexic then hits the other child. In relating the experience, the dyslexic child may reverse the sequence of events. He may remember that the other child called him a name, and he then took the toy and hit the other child.
This presents two major difficulties for the dyslexic child. First, it takes him longer to learn from his mistakes. Second, if an adult witnessed the events, and asks the dyslexic child what happened, the child seems to be lying.
Unfortunately, most interactions between children involve not three events, but 15 to 20. With his sequencing and memory problems, the dyslexic may relate a different sequence of events each time he tells the tale. Teachers, parents, and psychologists conclude that he is either psychotic or a pathological liar.
The inconsistencies of dyslexia produce serious challenges in a child’s life. There is a tremendous variability in the student’s individual abilities. Although everyone has strengths and weaknesses, the dyslexic’s are greatly exaggerated. Furthermore, the dyslexic’s strengths and weaknesses may be closely related.
I once worked with a young adult who received a perfect score on the Graduate Record Exam in mathematics. He could do anything with numbers except remember them. The graduate students he tutored in advanced statistics or calculus had great difficulty believing that he could not remember their telephone numbers.
These great variations produce a “roller coaster” effect for dyslexics. At times, they can accomplish tasks far beyond the abilities of their peers. At the next moment, they can be confronted with a task that they cannot accomplish. Many dyslexics call this “walking into black holes.” To deal with these kinds of problems, dyslexics need a thorough understanding of their learning disability. This will help them predict both success and failure. Dyslexics also perform erratically within tasks. That is, their errors are inconsistent. For example, I once asked a dyslexic adult to write a hundred word essay on television violence. As one might expect he misspelled the word “television” five times. However, he misspelled it a different way each time. This type of variation makes remediation more difficult.
Finally, dyslexics’ performance varies from day to day. On some days, reading may come fairly easily. However, another day, they may be barely able to write their own name. This inconsistency is extremely confusing not only to the dyslexic, but also to others in his environment.
Few other handicapping conditions are intermittent in nature. A child in a wheelchair remains there; in fact, if on some days the child can walk, most professionals would consider it a hysterical condition. However, for the dyslexic, performance fluctuates. This makes it extremely difficult for the individual to learn to compensate, because he or she cannot predict the intensity of the symptoms on a given day.
What does the dyslexic person feel?
Anxiety

Anxiety is the most frequent emotional symptom reported by dyslexic adults. Dyslexics become fearful because of their constant frustration and confusion in school. These feelings are exacerbated by the inconsistencies of dyslexia. Because they may anticipate failure, entering new situations can becomes extremely anxiety provoking.
Anxiety causes human beings to avoid whatever frightens them. The dyslexic is no exception. However, many teachers and parents misinterpret this avoidance behavior as laziness. In fact, the dyslexic’s hesitancy to participate in school activities such as homework is related more to anxiety and confusion than to apathy.
Anger

Many of the emotional problems caused by dyslexia occur out of frustration with school or social situations. Social scientists have frequently observed that frustration produces anger. This can be clearly seen in many dyslexics.
The obvious target of the dyslexic’s anger would be schools and teachers. However, it is also common for the dyslexic to vent his anger on his parents. Mothers are particularly likely to feel the dyslexic’s wrath. Often, the child sits on his anger during school to the point of being extremely passive. However, once he is in the safe environment of home, these very powerful feelings erupt and are often directed toward the mother. Ironically, it is the child’s trust of the mother that allows him to vent his anger. However, this becomes very frustrating and confusing to the parent who is desperately trying to help their child.
As youngsters reach adolescence, society expects them to become independent. The tension between the expectation of independence and the child’s learned dependence causes great internal conflicts. The adolescent dyslexic uses his anger to break away from those people on which he feels so dependent.
Because of these factors, it may be difficult for parents to help their teenage dyslexic. Instead, peer tutoring or a concerned young adult may be better able to intervene and help the child.
Self image

The dyslexic’s self–image appears to be extremely vulnerable to frustration and anxiety. According to Erik Erikson, during the first years of school, every child must resolve the conflicts between a positive self–image and feelings of inferiority. If children succeed in school, they will develop positive feelings about themselves and believe that they can succeed in life.
If children meet failure and frustration, they learn that they are inferior to others, and that their effort makes very little difference. Instead of feeling powerful and productive, they learn that their environment controls them. They feel powerless and incompetent.
Researchers have learned that when typical learners succeed, they credit their own efforts for their success. When they fail, they tell themselves to try harder. However, when the dyslexic succeeds, he is likely to attribute his success to luck. When he fails, he simply sees himself as stupid.
Research also suggests that these feelings of inferiority develop by the age of ten. After this age, it becomes extremely difficult to help the child develop a positive self–image. This is a powerful argument for early intervention.
Depression

Depression is also a frequent complication in dyslexia. Although most dyslexics are not depressed, children with this kind of learning disability are at higher risk for intense feelings of sorrow and pain. Perhaps because of their low self–esteem, dyslexics are afraid to turn their anger toward their environment and instead turn it toward themselves.
However, depressed children and adolescents often have different symptoms than do depressed adults. The depressed child is unlikely to be lethargic or to talk about feeling sad. Instead he or she may become more active or misbehave to cover up the painful feelings. In the case of masked depression, the child may not seem obviously unhappy. However, both children and adults who are depressed tend to have three similar characteristics:
First, they tend to have negative thoughts about themselves, i.e. a negative self–image.
Second, they tend to view the world negatively. They are less likely to enjoy the positive experiences in life. This makes it difficult for them to have fun.
Finally, most depressed youngsters have great trouble imagining anything positive about the future. The depressed dyslexic not only experiences great pain in his present experiences, but also foresees a life of continuing failure.
Family problems

Like any handicapping condition, dyslexia has a tremendous impact on the child’s family. However, because dyslexia is an invisible handicap, these effects are often overlooked.
Dyslexia affects the family in a variety of ways. One of the most obvious is sibling rivalry. Non–dyslexic children often feel jealous of the dyslexic child, who gets the majority of the parents’ attention, time, and money. Ironically, the dyslexic child does not want this attention. This increases the chances that he or she will act negatively against the achieving children in the family.
Specific developmental dyslexia runs in families. This means that one or both of the child’s parents may have had similar school problems. When faced with a child who is having school problems, dyslexic parents may react in one of two ways. They may deny the existence of dyslexia and believe if the child would just buckle down, he or she could succeed. Or, the parents may relive their failures and frustrations through their child’s school experience. This brings back powerful and terrifying emotions, which can interfere with the adult’s parenting skills.
How can parents and teachers help?
During the past 25 years, I have interviewed many dyslexic adults. Some have learned to deal successfully with their learning problems, while others have not. My experiences suggest that in addition to factors such as intelligence and socio–economic status, other things affect the dyslexic’s chances for success.
First, early in the child’s life, someone has been extremely supportive and encouraging. Second, the young dyslexic found an area in which he or she could succeed. Finally, successful dyslexics appear to have developed a commitment to helping others.
Both teachers and parents need to offer consistent, ongoing encouragement and support. However, one rarely hears about this very important way to help youngsters.
I believe encouragement involves at least four elements. First, listening to children’s feelings. Anxiety, anger and depression are daily companions for dyslexics. However, their language problems often make it difficult for them to express their feelings. Therefore, adults must help them learn to talk about their feelings.
Teachers and parents must reward effort, not just “the product”. For the dyslexic, grades should be less important than progress.
When confronting unacceptable behavior, adults must not inadvertently discourage the dyslexic child. Words such as “lazy” or “incorrigible” can seriously damage the child’s self–image.
Finally, it is important to help students set realistic goals for themselves. Most dyslexic students set perfectionistic and unattainable goals. By helping the child set an attainable goal, teachers can change the cycle of failure.
Even more important, the child needs to recognize and rejoice in his or her successes. To do so, he or she needs to achieve success in some area of life. In some cases, the dyslexic’s strengths are obvious, and many dyslexics’ self–esteem has been salvaged by prowess in athletics, art, or mechanics. However, the dyslexic’s strengths are often more subtle and less obvious. Parents and teachers need to find ways to relate the child’s interests to the demands of real life.
Finally, many successful dyslexic adults deal with their own pain by reaching out to others. They may do volunteer work for charities or churches, or choose vocations that require empathy and a social conscience. These experiences help dyslexics feel more positive about themselves and deal more effectively with their pain and frustration.
Many opportunities exist in our schools, homes and churches for dyslexics to help others. One important area is peer tutoring. If dyslexic students do well in math or science, they can be asked to tutor a classmate who is struggling.
Perhaps that student can reciprocate as a reader for the dyslexic student. Tutoring younger children, especially other dyslexics, can be a positive experience for everyone involved.
Helping dyslexics feel better about themselves and deal effectively with their feelings is a complex task.
First, caring adults must understand the cognitive and affective problems caused by dyslexia. Then they must design strategies that will help the dyslexic, like every other child, to find joy and success in academics and personal relationships.
About the author
Dr. Michael Ryan is a psychologist with a private practice in Grand Rapids, MI. He specializes in working with people with learning disabilities. A dyslexic himself, Dr. Ryan is a past president of the Michigan Branch of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) and a former national vice president of IDA.
Ryan, Michael. Social and Emotional Problems Related to Dyslexia. International Dyslexia Association Fact Sheet series. © Copyright 2004, The International Dyslexia Association (IDA). IDA encourages the reproduction and distribution of this fact sheet. If portions of the text are cited, appropriate reference must be made. Fact sheets may not be reprinted for the purpose of resale.

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Dyslexia reading apps

READING

Alphabet Zoo

Alphabet Zoo – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app helps teach letter-sound association in a structured game-like setting.

AppWriter

AppWriter – $19.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

AppWriter is comprised of text-to-speech software, context based word suggestions, and Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology to help with reading and writing.

AudioBooks

AudioBooks – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

AudioBooks allows you to listen to books. Some features include high-quality human recordings and access to all types of reading material.

Blio

Blio – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Blio makes e-reading easy with text-to-speech, highlighting words as you read, looking up unknown words or phrases, and being visually friendly to suit your needs.

Bob Books #1

Bob Books #1 – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

This app introduces and teaches various literacy skills, such as the connection between letters and sounds, sounding out simple words, and spelling words you’ve read using a structured game format.

Bugsy Pre-K

Bugsy Pre-K – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Bugsy Pre-K teaches essential pre-k skills such as colors, shapes, letters, phonics, numbers, and counting.

Cool Reader

Cool Reader – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.5 or later.

Cool Reader is an eBook reader that supports multiple eBook formats. The app has a text-to-speech function and other customizable features.

Dyslexic Like Me

Dyslexic Like Me – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

This interactive children’s book helps you learn about dyslexia and how to overcome it. Join a dyslexic boy named Austin as he learns about his dyslexia, gains confidence by discovering new learning techniques, and learns about many successful dyslexics.

Find the Letters HD

Find the Letters HD – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

This app aims to improve reading skills. Through coloring letters and numbers on a grid, you can uncover a fun illustration.

FirstWords Sampler

FirstWords Sampler – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app teaches about letters, how letters relate to sounds, and how to spell words.

Flashcards for iPad

Flashcards for iPad – $3.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Flashcards for iPad is a great app for young children just learning basic words or kids learning a second language. Pictures and sounds accompany each word, making it easy for kids to learn both the spelling and sound!

Go Read (Bookshare)

Go Read (Bookshare) – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.0 or later.

Go Read is a part of Bookshare, where you can access one of the largest online libraries. This app also has text-to-speech capabilities and is especially made for people with reading impairments.

GoodReader

GoodReader – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

GoodReader is a PDF reader that can quickly open Microsoft Office files, images, audio, and video files. In addition to reading the files, you can mark up the text with text boxes, lines, arrows, and sticky notes.

iStoryTime Kids Books

iStoryTime Kids Books – $0.99 per book

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

iStoryTime allows you to hear text read out loud and view illustrations.

iWordQ

iWordQ – $24.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

iWordQ helps struggling readers and writers through text-to-speech capabilities, text highlighting, and much more.

iWriteWords

iWrite Words – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Using a structured game format, iWriteWords teaches handwriting skills.

MeeGenius Kid's Book

MeeGenius! Kid’s Books – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

MeeGenius! contains a vast library of kids’ books, all of which are narrated by a human voice. The words are highlighted as they are read.

Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Merriam-Webster Dictionary – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app offers voice search to let you look up a word without having to spell it. It includes a thesaurus, example sentences, Word of the Day, and is a great reference tool.

Montessori Crosswords

Montessori Crosswords – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Montessori Crosswords can help you develop reading, writing, and spelling skills. Build words from a set of 320 word-image-audio-phonics combinations using a phonics-enabled movable alphabet.

Prizmo

Prizmo – $9.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Prizmo can read scanned documents to you; simply take a picture of the document with your phone, and Prizmo will read it aloud. You can also share the documents between devices or through cloud computing.

Read 2 Me

Read 2 Me – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

Read 2 Me lets you import .txt files and uses text-to-speech to read them aloud to you. You can easily bookmark important material, and there are many additional features for easy reading.

Read&Write

Read&Write – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

Through lessons and easy tracing games, Read&Write helps you learn phonics, read, write, and pronounce different letters and letter combinations.

Read2Go

Read2Go – $19.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Read2Go uses text-to-speech to help you read and comprehend books. With a Bookshare membership, you can browse, download, and read books, and you can customize reading speed, font, font size, and more.

Reading Trainer

Reading Trainer – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Reading Trainer will help you improve your reading speed and mental capacity with fun exercises. The app uses multiple reading techniques, and you can easily record and track your progress.

See Read Say

See Read Say – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.2 or later.

This app teaches grade appropriate Dolch words (the 220 words that appear most frequently in reading) by showing each word, speaking it aloud, and tracking your progress.

Sound Literacy

Sound Literacy – $24.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Sound Literacy is an instructional tool and resource for teaching phonemic awareness, phonological processing, the alphabetic principle, and morphemic awareness.

Speak It!

Speak It! – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Hear your emails, articles, and other online texts read aloud to you by simply copying and pasting the text into the app. Then, create audio files from the spoken text that you can save or email.

Stanza

Stanza – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Stanza contains over 100,000 free books available for download. You can change font size, line spacing, and color for easier reading.

Stories2Learn

Stories2Learn – $13.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.2 or later.

Stories2Learn allows you to create personalized stories using photos, text, and audio that can help improve literacy as well as social skills.

Storyrobe

Storyrobe – $.099

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Storyrobe makes creating a story simple — in just three steps. You just choose the photos or videos to accompany your story, use the voice feature to record the story, and share it with your friends!

StoryTime

StoryTime – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Recorded by children, Storytime is an interactive storytelling app. Each story has original graphics and voice, and also includes a game to help with reading comprehension.

Talk To Me

Talk To Me – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Talk to Me speaks words as you type them, and the words appear on every screen, no matter what you’re doing! There are many customizable features, including size of text and speed of reading.

Vocab Builder

Vocab Builder – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.6 or later.

Vocab Builder is a great way to learn new vocabulary words and is perfect for preparing for the SAT or GRE. You are quizzed on thousands of words, and a dictionary is included.

Voice Dream Reader

Voice Dream Reader – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

This text-to-speech app imports content from various sources and reads it aloud (web pages, PDF files, Word documents, PowerPoints, and more). It integrates with Dropbox, Instapaper, and Pocket.

Web Reader

Web Reader – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

Web Reader uses text-to-speech to read web pages, blogs, and other online content aloud.

Weesay ABC

Weesay ABC – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone. Requires iOS 2.2.1 or later.

Weesay ABC comes preloaded with an album of talking pictures for each letter of the alphabet. The camera and microphone can be used to create custom albums of alphabetic sounds and images.

Word Magic

Word Magic – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app teaches words and spelling. You are able to set initial, medial, or final position in words.

Words Words Words

Words Words Words – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.1 or later.

This app can help you build communication skills. It can teach you new words, how the words are properly used in context, and it can pronounce the words for you. There is even a fun, challenging game included.

Writing Machine

Writing Machine – $0.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Writing Machine shows how one picture and one word go together, how to read text from left to right, and how to tell words from letters.

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Best writing apps for dyslexia

WRITING

 

AlphaWriter

AlphaWriter – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

AlphaWriter helps you learn to read, write, and spell phonetically. Learn language basics, build skills to help you write your own story, and share your story via email when you’re done.

AppWriter

AppWriter – $19.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

AppWriter is comprised of text-to-speech software, context based word suggestions, and Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology to help with reading and writing.

Dictionary

Dictionary.com – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Android. Requires iOS 3.0 or later and Android devices 2.1 and later.

This app includes nearly 2 million easily accessible words. You can view definitions and synonyms with dictionary.com and thesaurus.com, with no internet connection required.

Dragon Dictation

Dragon Dictation – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Dragon Dictation is a voice recognition app that allows the user to see the text generated through speaking instead of typing. It can be used with popular social networking applications.

iCardSort

iCardSort – $5.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

This app is a great brainstorming tool. It helps you visually organize ideas quickly and easily and allows you to share them with others.

Idea Sketch

Idea Sketch – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Idea Sketch lets you easily draw a diagram (mind map, concept map, or flow chart), convert it to a text outline, and vice versa. It can be used to brainstorm new ideas, illustrate concepts, make lists and outlines, plan presentations, create organizational charts, and more.

iWordQ

iWordQ – $24.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

iWordQ helps struggling readers and writers through text-to-speech capabilities, text highlighting, and much more.

Montessori Crosswords

Montessori Crosswords – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Montessori Crosswords can help you develop reading, writing, and spelling skills. Build words from a set of 320 word-image-audio-phonics combinations using a phonics-enabled movable alphabet.

Note Taker HD

Note Taker HD – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

Notetaker HD handles all of your handwritten notes, diagrams, and drawings in one place. You can annotate PDF files, shrink text to fit on the screen, and customize how your notes are organized.

Pages

Pages – $9.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.2.8 or later.

This app allows you to create, edit, and view documents. It automatically zooms in on text while you type and zooms back out when you’re done, so it makes writing and editing easy.

PaperPort Notes

PaperPort Notes – Free

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

PaperPort Notes uses Dragon Dictate power to act as a digital note-taking tool. You can use it to combine documents, web content, audio, and typed text as well as handwritten notes into a single document.

Read&Write

Read&Write – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

Through lessons and easy tracing games, Read&Write helps you learn phonics, read, write, and pronounce different letters and letter combinations.

Sentence Builder

Sentence Builder – $5.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.1 or later.

Sentence Builder can help you learn how to build grammatically correct sentences. It includes 100 distinct pictures to build sentences around.

Speak It!

Speak It! – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Hear your emails, articles, and other online texts read aloud to you by simply copying and pasting the text into this app. Then, create audio files from the spoken text that you can save or email.

Story Builder

Story Builder – $7.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

Story Builder is designed to help you improve paragraph formation, integration of ideas, and higher level language such as inferences. The app aims to improve auditory processing by using audio clips.

StoryKit

StoryKit – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Create your very own electronic storybook with this fun app. Simply write some text, illustrate by drawing on the screen or upload photographs from existing albums, record sounds into your story, and lay out all the elements.

Typ-O HD

Typ-O HD – $14.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

This app uses word prediction and has a sophisticated spelling error model to help you focus on the content of your writing. Typ-O is able to identify the most common spelling mistakes and will often suggest words.

WordSort

WordSort – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

WordSort is a fun game for learning and understanding the parts of speech. There are three levels of the game as well as different difficulty settings for every learner.

Writing Prompts

Writing Prompts – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Writing Prompts helps make writing more fun. It provides a variety of scene elements, words, sketches, colors, genres, and writing types, allowing you to make your writing more imaginative.

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Best spelling apps

SPELLING

From:http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/tools/apps

A1 Spelling App

A1 Spelling App – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

A1 Spelling App teaches kids to spell by letting them hear words aloud and by utilizing repetition to help them remember. Words are accompanied by kid-friendly pictures.

ACT Spell

ACT Spell – $2.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

ACT Spell allows you to create your own word base of spelling words, and keeping the spelling process simple!

American Speller

American Speller – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app allows you to type in a word phonetically (based on how it sounds) and it will come up with the actual spelling of the word. It also provides definitions to help you understand the meaning of the word.

American Wordspeller

American Wordspeller – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

American Wordspeller is an app that allows you to find words that you may not know how to spell, but can sound out phonetically.

Bookworm

Bookworm – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 2.2.1 or later.

This app allows you to link letters left, right, up, and down to build words in a game format. Bigger words return better bonuses.

iSpell Word

iSpell Word – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

iSpell Word is an app designed to help kids learn simple English words. The app is in a game format, making it fun and interactive.

iSpellBetter

iSpellBetter – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

iSpellBetter is a fun game with increasingly challenging levels and adjustable difficulty modes to help with spelling.

Jumbline

Jumbline – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Jumbline is a word puzzle that challenges your speed, agility, pattern recognition, and spelling prowess as you try and find all the possible words within a set of letters. It includes a built-in dictionary.

Montessori Crosswords

Montessori Crosswords – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Montessori Crosswords can help you develop reading, writing, and spelling skills. Build words from a set of 320 word-image-audio-phonics combinations using a phonics-enabled movable alphabet.

Simplex Spelling HD: Dolch Sight Words

Simplex Spelling HD: Dolch Sight Words – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

This app helps children master basic sight words so they can build a solid foundation in spelling. The app focuses on word recognition rather than word memorization.

Simplex Spelling Phonics 1

Simplex Spelling Phonics 1 – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Simplex Spelling Phonics 1 contains 450 words divided into 42 different lists based on patterns and difficulty. Each list builds on the previous one to ensure that students learn the words.

Simplex Spelling Phonics 2

Simplex Spelling Phonics 2 – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

This app builds on Simplex Spelling Phonics 1, adding 650 more words in 54 different lists. Phonics 2 focuses on syllables and more difficult words.

Spelling Bee

Spelling Bee – $0.99

Compatible with Android devices 1.6 or later.

This app teaches you how to spell thousands of words with clear audio clips and increasing difficulty.

Spelling Bee Challenge

Spelling Bee Challenge – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

This app contains over 13,000 words at 10 different difficulty levels and works just like the spelling bee! There are also options to practice spelling or take spelling tests before taking the challenge.

Word Fall

Word Fall – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Word Fall is a fun way to practice spelling. As the words rain down from the sky, you have to spell as many as you can. The app has a dictionary and awards bonus points for longer words, helping kids increase their vocabulary.

Word Wizard

Word Wizard – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Word Wizard combines text-to-speech capabilities with spelling tasks to allow kids to hear each word and letter while spelling it. The app contains over 1,400 words but allows you to add more and create your own spelling list!

WordLadder

WordLadder – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

This word play app gives clues to help you complete a word ladder puzzle.

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Best phonics apps

PHONICS

 

ABC Magic Phonics

ABC Magic Phonics – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

ABC Magic Phonics teaches pronunciation of letters instead of letter names. This helps kids learn letter sounds and combinations, which can make them better readers. The app uses rhythm and repetition to help with memorization.

ABC Phonics Word Families

ABC Phonics Word Families – Free

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

This app focuses on the word families that make reading and word identification easier for young children. It aims to improve reading skills.

ABC Pocket Phonics

ABC Pocket Phonics – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

This phonics based application combines letter sounds, letter writing, and 170 first words to help teach reading.

Bats in the Cave

Bats in the Cave – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

Bats in the Cave is the second app in a series of apps that helps teachers, parents, and students grasp the importance of phonemic awareness and phonics.

Little Bats

Little Bats – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

Little Bats is the first app in a series of phonics apps, aimed at parents to help their kids, or used independently by children. The app is designed to teach phonics in a game format.

Montessori Letter Sounds HD

Montessori Letter Sounds HD – $2.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

Based on the Montessori method, Montessori Letter Sounds HD helps kids get a jump start on learning to read. The app is formatted as a game to ensure fun, progressive learning.

Phonics Genius

Phonics Genius – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

Phonics Genius is an easy way for children to learn to recognize, read, and speak words through letter sounds. The app contains over 6,000 words, grouped by phonics, in addition to the fun games for practice.

Preschool Adventure

Preschool Adventure – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

Preschool Adventure contains 18 educational activities that teach basic counting, rhythm, letters, shapes, and colors.

Read&Write

Read&Write – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

Through lessons and easy tracing games, Read&Write helps you learn phonics, read, write, and pronounce different letters and letter combinations.

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Best apps for ARTICULATION

ARTICULATION

 

Articulate It!

Articulate It! – $38.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Designed by a speech-language pathologist, Articulate It! has over 1,000 different images covering all sounds of the English language to help children improve their speech.

Articulation Station Pro

Articulation Station Pro – $49.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Created by a speech-language pathologist, Articulation Station Pro contains 22 different sound programs targeting over 1,000 words for pronunciation. In addition, the app has several activities to practice.

ArtikPix

ArtikPix – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

This app has flashcard and matching activities for individuals with speech-sound delays.

iSpeech

iSpeech – $3.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

iSpeech is an excellent tool for teaching and practicing speech therapy at home. It organizes sounds by the ages at which they should have developed, providing benchmarks for where children should be developmentally.

Pocket Artic

Pocket Artic – $29.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Pocket Artic contains over 2,100 flashcards that target by phoneme and by position of occurrence.

Smarty Speech

Smarty Speech – $9.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Smarty Speech contains hundreds of words with correlating pictures for practicing letter and word articulation. You can target specific IEP goals by sorting the words into different modes and processes.

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Best apps for maths

MATH

 

Cloud Math

Cloud Math – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Learn basic addition and subtraction in a fun easy way with this app. You can change the difficulty level as you progress.

Coin Math

Coin Math – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Learn how to recognize, count, add, and make change with U.S. coins.

Math Drills

Math Drills – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

This multi-person app allows up to 50 students to practice simple mathematical functions. Each student’s questions are customized to his/her strengths and weaknesses, and progress reports are available.

My Math Flashcards

My Math Flashcards – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

This app can help you master simple mathematical functions — addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. It can also be customized to focus on a particular fact, such as multiplication by 1 or 0.

Splash Math (Grades 1-5)

Splash Math (Grades 1-5) – Free or $9.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

These apps are grade-specific, making it easy for students to practice math skills for grades 1-5. All content is aligned to the common core standards.

Visual Multiplication Table

Visual Multiplication Table – $4.49

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

This app helps you learn multiplication visually by displaying graphically rich multiplication tables.

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Beat apps for RESOURCE & REFERENCE

RESOURCE & REFERENCE

 

CamScanner

CamScanner – Free or $4.99

Compatible with Android devices 2.0 or later.

CamScannerHD (tablets) and CamScanner (phone) turns your device into a document scanner. Scan any document and the app will convert it into a PDF.

iAdvocate

iAdvocate – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

iAdvocate can help you develop and share specific strategies for working with a school to improve your children’s education. It has problem-based learning strategies, simulations, access resources, and more.

IEP Checklist

IEP Checklist – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

This app has the ability to record IEP meetings and voice notes as well as export IEP checklists and custom notes. It provides access to the federal regulation website and a checklist to review priorities.

Moms with Apps

Moms with Apps – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Moms With Apps is a catalog of great children’s and family-friendly apps. Search by educational categories and age groups to discover new apps and developers.

SketchBook Express

SketchBook Express – Free or $1.99

Compatible with Android devices 3.0 or later.

This app is a virtual sketchbook for all of your drawings and doodles.

SoundGecko

SoundGecko – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 5.1 or later.

SoundGecko allows you to convert text articles online into MP3s. Simply copy the website, add your email address, and download the MP3.

TED

TED – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.1 or later.

With the TED app, you can access hundreds of talks from some of the world’s biggest innovators.

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Top apps for study

RGANIZATION & STUDY SKILLS

AnkiDroid

AnkiDroid – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.5 or later.

With this app, you can learn just about anything. There are thousands of free flashcard decks available for download, or you can create your own, and it comes with text-to-speech capabilities.

Audio Class Notes

Audio Class Notes – Free or $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.1 or later.

Audio Class Notes is a helpful tool to record and keep track of class notes. You can easily tag and jump to the important parts of the lecture, making studying easier.

AudioNote

AudioNote – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.1 or later.

AudioNote records and syncs your notes. It combines the functionality of a notepad and voice recorder to create a powerful tool that will save you time while improving the quality of your notes.

Awesome Note

Awesome Note – $3.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app can create to-do lists, memos, important information, and diary entries that can transfer easily to email, Google Docs, and Evernote. In addition, you can color code folders and icons to help you stay organized.

Checklist 2

Checklist 2 – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

CheckList 2 is made for both personal and group use, making it easy to organize any to-do list. The app is easy-to-use and will track the list until the items on it are completed.

Chore Pad

Chore Pad – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

This app allows you to keep track of and remember chores.

Color Note

ColorNote – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.5 or later.

Use this app when you want to jot down memos, emails, or a grocery list. You can return to your notes later and edit them, organize them by color, save them to SD storage, and organize your schedule in a calendar.

CourseNotes

CourseNotes – $3.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

CourseNotes color codes your notebooks and adds teachers. You can take notes during your classes, organize them by class and subject, and review them later. You can also keep to-do lists and track assignment deadlines.

Dropbox

Dropbox – Free

Requirements vary.

With Dropbox, you can take files from your computer or phone wherever you go. You can even share your Dropbox with others, and vice versa.

Evernote

Evernote – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Android. Requires iOS 3.0 or later and Android devices 1.6 or later.

Evernote allows you to easily create text, photo, and audio notes, which can be synchronized to any computer to help you remember important things.

EverStudent

EverStudent – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.6 or later.

EverStudent syncs with Evernote and allows you to easily organize all of your assignments and due dates into one, sleek, customizable planner.

Flashcards Deluxe

Flashcards Deluxe – $3.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Use this app to create flashcards to help you study.

Ghostwriter Notes

Ghostwriter Notes – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

Ghostwriter Notes allows you to take notes, annotate PDFs, and import images and diagrams for faster note-taking. The app also allows you to export pages from your notes to a photo album, Dropbox, or Evernote.

HomeWork

HomeWork – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.6 or later.

HomeWork keeps track of all of your due dates for you. See how much homework you’ve completed, when your next test date is, and much more.

iAnnotate

iAnnotate – $9.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

iAnnotate allows you to receive and mark up PDF files from your students. You can take notes, highlight an important fact, and make corrections.

iHomework

iHomework – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

iHomework helps you keep track of assignments and grades, and allows you to create to-do lists.

inClass

inClass – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Use inClass to create schedules and calendars to keep track of coursework, job tasks, and social activities. It will alert you when things are due and allows you to take video, audio, and picture notes.

iThoughts

iThoughts – $7.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

iThoughts allows you to easily record and organize your ideas into a mind map. It’s compatible with email and other apps, so you can export the mind maps to your camera roll, send them in an email, and more.

LectureTools

LectureTools – Free

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

LectureTools combines note-taking with a student inquiry-and-response feature to connect professor with student. Interactive elements can be added and accessed before, during, and after the lecture.

Mindjet

Mindjet – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.1 or later.

Mindjet organizes everything from thoughts and ideas to notes and to-do lists. The app contains many customizable features to make your mind maps and lists easy to read.

MindNode

MindNode – $9.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

MindNode easily organizes your thoughts as mind maps, taking all of your ideas and putting them in a visual display. This app is great for brainstorming, planning, outlining, and even printing your finished mind map.

My Class Schedule

My Class Schedule – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.1 or later.

Use My Class Schedule to track homework due dates, upcoming exams, class schedules, and activities. You can color-coordinate your schedules and customize the app in many other ways.

myHomework

myHomework – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Android. Requires iOS 4.0 or later and Android devices 2.1 and later.

myHomework provides an easy way for you to keep track of homework, classes, tests, and projects. It creates a colorful calendar of upcoming due dates and even provides audio notifications.

Notability

Notability – $0.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Notability is a note-taking app that allows you to type, insert a figure, and insert a web clip or a picture. It also allows you to record a teacher’s lecture.

Note Everything

Note Everything – Free or $4.19

Compatible with Android devices 1.5 or later.

Note Everything lets you type, speak, and paint notes right into the app, and you can send your notes anywhere.

Nudge

Nudge – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Nudge is a quick note to remember something for tomorrow: bring pens to school, tie-dying bring in a white shirt. It is set, and until you shut it off, it nudges you.

PaperDesk

PaperDesk – $3.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

PaperDesk closely mimics a blank sheet of paper for note-taking, but has additional features. You can import or export files, draw pictures to accompany your notes, and more.

Pocket

Pocket – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.6 or later.

Pocket allows you to safely store important information on your phone. Everything is encrypted and backed up online.

Popplet

Popplet – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

Popplet allows you to create, organize, and sort all of your ideas. You can make lists and notes, organize diagrams and flowcharts, brainstorm ideas, and even create photo galleries.

QuickVoice Recorder

QuickVoice Recorder – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

This app allows you to record audio such as memos, class lectures and notes, meetings, and dictations of emails or text messages. It is ideal for professional, educational, and personal use.

Remind101

Remind101 – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

Remind101 allows for safe and easy communication between parents, students, and teachers. Students can join a class by sending a text message to the teacher, and teachers can text reminders to parents (for up to 10 different classes) about important dates, homework assignments, tests, or quizzes. All phone numbers are hidden.

SaveMeeting

SaveMeeting – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Android. Requires iOS 4.3 or later and Android devices 2.2 or later.

With SaveMeeting, you can record any meeting, lecture, or interview, use audio marks to bookmark the important details, and share the files with others. It can also transcribe important audio files.

SchoolNotebook

SchoolNotebook – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

SchoolNotebook lets you organize and share your class schedule. Sign in with your Facebook account, and begin sharing your class schedule and class notes with your friends.

SimpleMind+

SimpleMind+ – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

Easily organize your thoughts into a mind map and customize it with SimpleMind+. You can share your mind map via the Internet, email, and your camera roll.

SoundNote

SoundNote – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

SoundNote records the audio of a lecture or meeting while you take notes. You can add your own notes to certain points in the audio, mark important information, and share your notes via email when finished.

StayOnTask

StayOnTask – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.1 or later.

This app will help you stay focused on your work. It is a timer that randomly checks up on you, so you can’t predict when the alarm will sound.

STUDYBLUE Flashcards

STUDYBLUE Flashcards – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and Android. Requires iOS 3.2 or later and Android devices 1.6 and later.

Use STUDYBLUE to create your own flashcards so you can reviewr class notes in your spare time.

Sync Voice Note

Sync Voice Note – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.1 or later.

Sync Voice Note is a note-taker and audio recorder. You can synchronize audio with your own notes, highlight text, and tab over, making it easy to mark your place in a long line of text.

Time for School

Time for School – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.6 or later.

Time for School is designed to keep your academic life more organized. The app contains an alarm to notify you of when your next class starts, when your homework assignments are due, or when you should wake up.

Time Timer

Time Timer – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Use this app for timing activities. As the time elapses, the red portion gets smaller, offering a visual aid. Time Timer also has an audible bell tone played when the time is up.

Timer (Intuit)

Timer (Intuit) – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.5 or later.

Timer lets you keep track of any daily task. You are also able to run multiple timers at once.

ToDo

ToDo – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

ToDo helps you manage tasks using audio alerts, subtasks, and checklists. It can also be synchronized with Outlook and iCal.

Write Pad

Write Pad – $9.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

Write Pad can recognize handwriting, let you write a note with your finger or a stylus, check spelling, and much more. It is great for those who need help with keyboarding.

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