Tips on how to teach your dyslexic child to read.

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Dyslexics have difficulty recalling words.

As soon as your child has learned enough common sight words if they continue reading very easy books every day they will usually be able to recall the words they have learned and gradually build up a reading vocabulary.

If your child reads only now and then, they will forget the words, begin substituting others, become discouraged and make little progress.
Easy going love may lead a parent to neglect daily reading.

There are so many things that make it difficult to read daily your child wants to play, they have homework, birthday parties, play dates, the list goes on and on. If your dyslexic child’s reading is often neglected, they assume it is unimportant and cease to cooperate.
To teach your dyslexic child to read, you must have proper materials and know-how, but most of all you must have tough love. Love strong enough to enable you to find the time every single day to help your child to read.

Reading must be part of your child’s daily routine the same as brushing teeth, having breakfast or getting up in the morning.

 

Choosing a book.

Use the 5 finger rule to determine if the book is “just right”

1. Open a book to any page.

2. Start reading the page.
3. Hold up one finger for EVERY word that you don’t know or have 
trouble pronouncing.

 
0-1 Fingers 
The book is too EASY.
2-3 Fingers 
The book is at the Interest level.
4 Fingers 
The book is at the Challenge level. You can try it ~ be sure it makes sense.

5 Fingers 
The book is at the Frustration level and is not a good choice for now.

 

 
How to do paired Reading.

  • Read aloud from the book with your child.
  • When your child taps your hand, let them read alone as you follow along silently.
  • If your child reads a word wrong, skips a word, or doesn’t know a word the use the 5 second rule, count five then.
  1. Point to the word.
  2. Tell them the word
  3. Have them repeat the word
  4. Join them in reading aloud again

 

Talk about the story.

 

  • What do you think it’s about?
  • What happened?
  • Who are the main characters?
  • What do you think will happen next?
  • If the book is too hard (5 words wrong in 100) change the book.

You must be enthusiastic and supportive. Daily practice brings success!

Getting the kids to sleep on Christmas Eve

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Hearing Your Child Read

For an ‘untrained’ parent, hearing your child read can be a very frustrating experience.

Reading with your child at home can easily become very stressful if it is not handled correctly. It can cause great frustration if you feel that your child is not learning to read as fast as you expect, or if you have discovered that your child is dyslexic. This article will set out some guidelines which have proved extremely helpful to many parents.

The first point is to realize that reading a book together must be for pleasure, and is not the time to be stopping over difficult words and trying to work out what they say from the sounds of the letters.

If your child cannot read a word within a second or two then use the Golden Rule: just tell them the word and move on with the story. This goes against most parents’ instincts, but is the only way for the two of you to get on with the book and enjoy the story. When you read the book again the following evening, you will find that your child remembers more of the ‘difficult’ words you had to supply, and will improve each evening. The important thing is that your child is learning to be confident that you will always tell them a word which they do not know, and can trust that reading with you will be a pleasurable experience.

Unfortunately, the alternative scenario is all too well-known to us all: your child sees a difficult word, tenses up and makes a frantic effort to work it out. Meanwhile, you also tense up, feeling that your child will never learn to read!

Because of the history of the English spelling system, which has grown from lots of different sources, many words are impossible to work out from the sounds of their letters.

‘Cat’ is straightforward, as are ‘log’, ‘hit’, and ‘get’. But what about words like ‘though’? The spelling has no resemblance to the actual word that we say, and no-one can possibly know what the word says unless they are told. No-one can work out how to read words like ‘said’, ‘early’, ‘was’, ‘phone’ and thousands more from the sounds of their letters. Unfortunately we have inherited a highly irregular spelling system which we are stuck with!

However, with the growing confidence that you will always tell them a word they do not know, children do learn to read. You will notice them using other clues, like the pictures on the page, or guesses from the meaning of the sentence, and it is good to encourage them to use these clues. Provided that they have the opportunity to go over the same book on different evenings, they will gradually come to learn the new words in it, and to enjoy the story – which is what reading is all about!

Another simple method to make things easier is to share the reading with your child: read one sentence each (while still coming in straight away with any difficult words for your child). This will teach your child to look out for the next period/full stop, and will help them get an idea of what a sentence is.

Repetition of the same phrases also helps tremendously in the early stages, when your child knows that the same sentence will be repeated at each stage of the story.

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For one to one consultations phone 085 1445494 (Dublin)

www.braingymdublin.net

Bean bag activities

mail.google.combean bagsb bag presentBean bags

Bean bags are particularly well adapted for developing the ability to throw and catch objects. Small children and children with motor or visual difficulties can play successfully with a bean bag when it would be impossible for them to play with a ball. The child is able to catch the bean bag by just getting his hand in front of it whereas he has to coordinate his grasp to a much greater extent to catch a ball. If he misses the bean bag, it hits the ground and slides to a stop in a short distance. If he misses the ball, it bounces and rolls and the child has to chase it. Therefore the bean bag is much less frustrating.
1.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and catch it when it comes down.

2.​Throw the bean bag up and make it just touch the ceiling. Then throw it up and make it come as close to the ceiling as you can without touching the ceiling.

3.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your right foot when it comes down.

4.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your left foot when it comes down.

5.​Throw a bean bag up in the air. On the command “right”, “left”, or “both” catch the bean bag with the right hand, the left hand, or both hands.

6.​Throw the bean bag up in the air. When it reaches the top of its trajectory close your eyes. Try to catch the bean bag with your eyes closed. This activity requires the child to visualise the path that the bean bag will follow in its descent and predict where it will fall. This is an important part of his training.

7.​Hold two bean bags, one in each hand. Throw both bean bags in the air simultaneously and catch them when they come back down.

8.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and catch them with the opposite hands. Catch the bean bag thrown with the right hand in the left hand, and catch the bean bag thrown with the left hand in the right hand.

9.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and clap a rhythm pattern with hands (clap, clap, clap, pause, clap) before catching the bean bags.

10.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air, clap your hands, slap your legs, then catch the bean bags.

11.​Invent five new patters to clap, slap or stamp while throwing and catching the bean bags.

12.​Keep two bean bags in motion by throwing one up in the air, watching it reach the top of the trajectory, then throwing the other one up and so on.

13.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences, for example left –2, right –1. Continue the sequence at least 10 times.

14.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences that include left, right and both hands. Left –2, right –1, both -2. Repeat 10 times.

For a how to make bean bags video and downloads with more activities visit my website www.braingymdublin.net click on the red button called Free  christmas gift on the home page to take you to the video and down loads.

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For one to one consultations phone 085 1445494 (Dublin)

Help your child with learning difficulties.

Learning Difficulties (parents help)

"Parenting"

“Parenting” (Photo credit: Carol VanHook)

During this one to one consultation I can help parents  develop a common and consistent approach to their children. This consultation focuses on providing parents with specific skills, introduces them to new resources and strategies to address their child’s learning problems.

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Phone  085 1445494 (Dublin)

Why is my dyslexic child so angry at me?

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Anger

Social and Emotional Problems Related to Dyslexia
By: Michael Ryan, M.D. and International Dyslexia Association (2004)

Many of the emotional problems caused by dyslexia occur out of frustration with school or social situations. Social scientists have frequently observed that frustration produces anger. This can be clearly seen in many dyslexics.
The obvious target of the dyslexic’s anger would be schools and teachers. However, it is also common for the dyslexic to vent his anger on his parents. Mothers are particularly likely to feel the dyslexic’s wrath. Often, the child sits on his anger during school to the point of being extremely passive. However, once he is in the safe environment of home, these very powerful feelings erupt and are often directed toward the mother. Ironically, it is the child’s trust of the mother that allows him to vent his anger. However, this becomes very frustrating and confusing to the parent who is desperately trying to help their child.
As youngsters reach adolescence, society expects them to become independent. The tension between the expectation of independence and the child’s learned dependence causes great internal conflicts. The adolescent dyslexic uses his anger to break away from those people on which he feels so dependent.
Because of these factors, it may be difficult for parents to help their teenage dyslexic. Instead, peer tutoring or a concerned young adult may be better able to intervene and help the child.

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Phone 085 1445494 (Dublin) for consultations.

Dyslexia reading apps

READING

Alphabet Zoo

Alphabet Zoo – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app helps teach letter-sound association in a structured game-like setting.

AppWriter

AppWriter – $19.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

AppWriter is comprised of text-to-speech software, context based word suggestions, and Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology to help with reading and writing.

AudioBooks

AudioBooks – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

AudioBooks allows you to listen to books. Some features include high-quality human recordings and access to all types of reading material.

Blio

Blio – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Blio makes e-reading easy with text-to-speech, highlighting words as you read, looking up unknown words or phrases, and being visually friendly to suit your needs.

Bob Books #1

Bob Books #1 – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

This app introduces and teaches various literacy skills, such as the connection between letters and sounds, sounding out simple words, and spelling words you’ve read using a structured game format.

Bugsy Pre-K

Bugsy Pre-K – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Bugsy Pre-K teaches essential pre-k skills such as colors, shapes, letters, phonics, numbers, and counting.

Cool Reader

Cool Reader – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.5 or later.

Cool Reader is an eBook reader that supports multiple eBook formats. The app has a text-to-speech function and other customizable features.

Dyslexic Like Me

Dyslexic Like Me – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

This interactive children’s book helps you learn about dyslexia and how to overcome it. Join a dyslexic boy named Austin as he learns about his dyslexia, gains confidence by discovering new learning techniques, and learns about many successful dyslexics.

Find the Letters HD

Find the Letters HD – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.3 or later.

This app aims to improve reading skills. Through coloring letters and numbers on a grid, you can uncover a fun illustration.

FirstWords Sampler

FirstWords Sampler – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app teaches about letters, how letters relate to sounds, and how to spell words.

Flashcards for iPad

Flashcards for iPad – $3.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Flashcards for iPad is a great app for young children just learning basic words or kids learning a second language. Pictures and sounds accompany each word, making it easy for kids to learn both the spelling and sound!

Go Read (Bookshare)

Go Read (Bookshare) – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.0 or later.

Go Read is a part of Bookshare, where you can access one of the largest online libraries. This app also has text-to-speech capabilities and is especially made for people with reading impairments.

GoodReader

GoodReader – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

GoodReader is a PDF reader that can quickly open Microsoft Office files, images, audio, and video files. In addition to reading the files, you can mark up the text with text boxes, lines, arrows, and sticky notes.

iStoryTime Kids Books

iStoryTime Kids Books – $0.99 per book

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

iStoryTime allows you to hear text read out loud and view illustrations.

iWordQ

iWordQ – $24.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

iWordQ helps struggling readers and writers through text-to-speech capabilities, text highlighting, and much more.

iWriteWords

iWrite Words – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Using a structured game format, iWriteWords teaches handwriting skills.

MeeGenius Kid's Book

MeeGenius! Kid’s Books – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

MeeGenius! contains a vast library of kids’ books, all of which are narrated by a human voice. The words are highlighted as they are read.

Merriam-Webster Dictionary

Merriam-Webster Dictionary – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app offers voice search to let you look up a word without having to spell it. It includes a thesaurus, example sentences, Word of the Day, and is a great reference tool.

Montessori Crosswords

Montessori Crosswords – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Montessori Crosswords can help you develop reading, writing, and spelling skills. Build words from a set of 320 word-image-audio-phonics combinations using a phonics-enabled movable alphabet.

Prizmo

Prizmo – $9.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Prizmo can read scanned documents to you; simply take a picture of the document with your phone, and Prizmo will read it aloud. You can also share the documents between devices or through cloud computing.

Read 2 Me

Read 2 Me – $4.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

Read 2 Me lets you import .txt files and uses text-to-speech to read them aloud to you. You can easily bookmark important material, and there are many additional features for easy reading.

Read&Write

Read&Write – $1.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 4.2 or later.

Through lessons and easy tracing games, Read&Write helps you learn phonics, read, write, and pronounce different letters and letter combinations.

Read2Go

Read2Go – $19.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 4.0 or later.

Read2Go uses text-to-speech to help you read and comprehend books. With a Bookshare membership, you can browse, download, and read books, and you can customize reading speed, font, font size, and more.

Reading Trainer

Reading Trainer – $4.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Reading Trainer will help you improve your reading speed and mental capacity with fun exercises. The app uses multiple reading techniques, and you can easily record and track your progress.

See Read Say

See Read Say – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.2 or later.

This app teaches grade appropriate Dolch words (the 220 words that appear most frequently in reading) by showing each word, speaking it aloud, and tracking your progress.

Sound Literacy

Sound Literacy – $24.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Sound Literacy is an instructional tool and resource for teaching phonemic awareness, phonological processing, the alphabetic principle, and morphemic awareness.

Speak It!

Speak It! – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Hear your emails, articles, and other online texts read aloud to you by simply copying and pasting the text into the app. Then, create audio files from the spoken text that you can save or email.

Stanza

Stanza – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Stanza contains over 100,000 free books available for download. You can change font size, line spacing, and color for easier reading.

Stories2Learn

Stories2Learn – $13.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.2 or later.

Stories2Learn allows you to create personalized stories using photos, text, and audio that can help improve literacy as well as social skills.

Storyrobe

Storyrobe – $.099

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Storyrobe makes creating a story simple — in just three steps. You just choose the photos or videos to accompany your story, use the voice feature to record the story, and share it with your friends!

StoryTime

StoryTime – Free

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

Recorded by children, Storytime is an interactive storytelling app. Each story has original graphics and voice, and also includes a game to help with reading comprehension.

Talk To Me

Talk To Me – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1 or later.

Talk to Me speaks words as you type them, and the words appear on every screen, no matter what you’re doing! There are many customizable features, including size of text and speed of reading.

Vocab Builder

Vocab Builder – Free

Compatible with Android devices 1.6 or later.

Vocab Builder is a great way to learn new vocabulary words and is perfect for preparing for the SAT or GRE. You are quizzed on thousands of words, and a dictionary is included.

Voice Dream Reader

Voice Dream Reader – $2.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.

This text-to-speech app imports content from various sources and reads it aloud (web pages, PDF files, Word documents, PowerPoints, and more). It integrates with Dropbox, Instapaper, and Pocket.

Web Reader

Web Reader – $1.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.1.3 or later.

Web Reader uses text-to-speech to read web pages, blogs, and other online content aloud.

Weesay ABC

Weesay ABC – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone. Requires iOS 2.2.1 or later.

Weesay ABC comes preloaded with an album of talking pictures for each letter of the alphabet. The camera and microphone can be used to create custom albums of alphabetic sounds and images.

Word Magic

Word Magic – $0.99

Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Requires iOS 3.0 or later.

This app teaches words and spelling. You are able to set initial, medial, or final position in words.

Words Words Words

Words Words Words – Free

Compatible with Android devices 2.1 or later.

This app can help you build communication skills. It can teach you new words, how the words are properly used in context, and it can pronounce the words for you. There is even a fun, challenging game included.

Writing Machine

Writing Machine – $0.99

Compatible with iPad. Requires iOS 3.2 or later.

Writing Machine shows how one picture and one word go together, how to read text from left to right, and how to tell words from letters.

Don’t forget to share if you like this post ;)

For one to one or group consultations 

Phone: 085 1445494

or email braingymdublin@gmail.com

Bean bag activities

Bean bags

Bean bags are particularly well adapted for developing the ability to throw and catch objects. Small children and children with motor or visual difficulties can play successfully with a bean bag when it would be impossible for them to play with a ball. The child is able to catch the bean bag by just getting his hand in front of it whereas he has to coordinate his grasp to a much greater extent to catch a ball. If he misses the bean bag, it hits the ground and slides to a stop in a short distance. If he misses the ball, it bounces and rolls and the child has to chase it. Therefore the bean bag is much less frustrating.
1.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and catch it when it comes down.

2.​Throw the bean bag up and make it just touch the ceiling. Then throw it up and make it come as close to the ceiling as you can without touching the ceiling.

3.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your right foot when it comes down.

4.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your left foot when it comes down.

5.​Throw a bean bag up in the air. On the command “right”, “left”, or “both” catch the bean bag with the right hand, the left hand, or both hands.

6.​Throw the bean bag up in the air. When it reaches the top of its trajectory close your eyes. Try to catch the bean bag with your eyes closed. This activity requires the child to visualise the path that the bean bag will follow in its descent and predict where it will fall. This is an important part of his training.

7.​Hold two bean bags, one in each hand. Throw both bean bags in the air simultaneously and catch them when they come back down.

8.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and catch them with the opposite hands. Catch the bean bag thrown with the right hand in the left hand, and catch the bean bag thrown with the left hand in the right hand.

9.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and clap a rhythm pattern with hands (clap, clap, clap, pause, clap) before catching the bean bags.

10.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air, clap your hands, slap your legs, then catch the bean bags.

11.​Invent five new patters to clap, slap or stamp while throwing and catching the bean bags.

12.​Keep two bean bags in motion by throwing one up in the air, watching it reach the top of the trajectory, then throwing the other one up and so on.

13.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences, for example left –2, right –1. Continue the sequence at least 10 times.

14.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences that include left, right and both hands. Left –2, right –1, both -2. Repeat 10 times.

Visit www.braingymdublin.net for how to video and free activity downloads.

Click red free gift button on home page.

Don’t forget to share if you like this post ;)

For one to one consultations phone 085 1445494 (Dublin)

To help with left – right disorientation

Writing

Image via Wikipedia

Here’s a simple trick:

When you hold your hands up in front of you, as you view your thumb and index finger on your LEFT hand, you see the letter “L”.

Use a squishy ball in your hand as you write. Hold it in the opposite hand with which you write. Holding an object in your opposite hand helps one to focus on task at hand so they do not move around in their seat as much and also keeps the other side of the brain occupied.

Don’t forget to share if you like this post ;)

For one to one consultations: phone 085 1445494 (Dublin)