Setting Smart Goals.

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Having goals plays a large part in how happy (and unhappy ) we are.
When we are successful in achieving or moving towards our goals we are happier.

On the other hand we may feel blocked or stuck and unmotivated to achieve the goals we have set for ourselves.
Goals need to be structured much like any project I.e. if you want to paint a room you will have a structure around it , choose the color get the paint, brushes etc prepare the room and so on.

Think about the terms.
1.What is my goal
2.What are the rules for achieving that goal.
3.What skills do I need to achieve my goal?
When a goal is structured in this way it is engaged in differently.
Allow yourself success by setting small achievable goals.A goal can be set on a daily basis.

  • Take the stairs instead of the lift
  • Get up ten minutes earlier
  • Make real tea in a tea pot with real tea leafs the ritual is very calming.

Small goals give instant feedback, they lift our mood and have a lasting effect on our lives.

 

Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration. Eye Tracking

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Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration.
Eye Tracking

Materials: Hidden picture magazines and games like where’s Waldo? also, Highlights, magazine offers a lot of hidden picture activities.

Method: Have the child do the activities below.

Levels 1 to 2: Use the Highlight, magazines or where’s Waldo? Books.

Levels 3 to 5: Use normal reading material. Designate a letter (for example, R) and ask the child to look at the page of print and circle as many R’s as he can. Vary the letters he is to find. Time him and see how fast he can find the designated letter. You can vary this and ask him to find blends or circle all the words with “tion” in them or that end with “ing).

Letter Search

Materials: Normal reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 2 to 5: The child is to circle all words where a letter appears twice. This can be varied by finding words with three letters or words where there are no letters that appear more than once. For younger children, use large print books. The child is to scan to a left to right direction on each line of print. He is not to randomly search or use his finger as a marker to keep his place.

Words in Words

Materials: Reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 3 to 5: Have the child find as many words as he can that are hidden in other words. For example many = man; other = the.

One Foot Hop

Materials: None.

Method: Have the child do the following activities.

Level 1:

Have the child hop in place on one leg, hop four steps forward, four steps backward, hop to the left, hop to the right, hop in place and turn around.
Repeat with opposite foot.

Level 2:

Hop while grasping the ankle with the opposite hand behind the back.
Hop while grasping the leg in front of the body with both hands.
The child should try to do at least 10 hops across the room on each foot.

Coordination between left and right.
Stepping Stones:

Materials: Different coloured tile or carpet cut into 4 inch squares (have 20 squares – 10 of one colour and 10 of another colour).

Method: The child is to walk on the squares. He is to keep his body straight and have good posture.

Level 1: Put the squares in a straight line. The child is to walk on them and keep his balance.

Level 2:

Arrange the squares slightly off centre with one colour on the right of centre and the other on the left of centre. For example:

R B
R B
R B

Have the child walk on the squares and call out the side that is stepping on the square. For example, each time he steps on the blue square, he calls out “right” and each time he steps on the red square, he calls out “left”.

Put the squares in various patterns that make up letters or numbers. Have the child walk on the patterns and tell you which letter or number it is.

Pattern Hopping

Materials: None.

Method: The child will do the following activities.

Level 1:

The child stands in front of you, arms at his side. Have him hop up and down. Make sure both is feet leave and touch the floor at the same time.
Have him hop across the room on one foot. Have him do it first with his right foot and then hop back on his left foot.

Level 2:

Clap a pattern and have him hop to the pattern. For example, one clap, pause and two quick claps would be one hop, pause and two quick hops. Have him do this first on both feet, then on one foot.
Do #1, but have the child facing away from you as so he cannot see you clapping.

Level 3: Have the child facing you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, clap, pause, clap, and clap, clap would be right, left, pause, and right, left, right.

Level 4: Have the child facing away from you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet and call out which foot he is hopping on as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, pause, clap, clap, he would hop and call out “right”, pause, “left”, “right”.

Getting the kids to sleep on Christmas Eve

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Setting Smart Goals.

mail.google.com99

Having goals plays a large part in how happy (and unhappy ) we are.
When we are successful in achieving or moving towards our goals we are happier.

On the other hand we may feel blocked or stuck and unmotivated to achieve the goals we have set for ourselves.
Goals need to be structured much like any project I.e. if you want to paint a room you will have a structure around it , choose the color get the paint, brushes etc prepare the room and so on.

Think about the terms.
1.What is my goal
2.What are the rules for achieving that goal.
3.What skills do I need to achieve my goal?
When a goal is structured in this way it is engaged in differently.
Allow yourself success by setting small achievable goals.A goal can be set on a daily basis.

  • Take the stairs instead of the lift
  • Get up ten minutes earlier
  • Make real tea in a tea pot with real tea leafs the ritual is very calming.

Small goals give instant feedback, they lift our mood and have a lasting effect on our lives.
Fiona Phelan 085 1445494

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www.braingymdublin.net

 

 

Bean bag activities

mail.google.combean bagsb bag presentBean bags

Bean bags are particularly well adapted for developing the ability to throw and catch objects. Small children and children with motor or visual difficulties can play successfully with a bean bag when it would be impossible for them to play with a ball. The child is able to catch the bean bag by just getting his hand in front of it whereas he has to coordinate his grasp to a much greater extent to catch a ball. If he misses the bean bag, it hits the ground and slides to a stop in a short distance. If he misses the ball, it bounces and rolls and the child has to chase it. Therefore the bean bag is much less frustrating.
1.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and catch it when it comes down.

2.​Throw the bean bag up and make it just touch the ceiling. Then throw it up and make it come as close to the ceiling as you can without touching the ceiling.

3.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your right foot when it comes down.

4.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your left foot when it comes down.

5.​Throw a bean bag up in the air. On the command “right”, “left”, or “both” catch the bean bag with the right hand, the left hand, or both hands.

6.​Throw the bean bag up in the air. When it reaches the top of its trajectory close your eyes. Try to catch the bean bag with your eyes closed. This activity requires the child to visualise the path that the bean bag will follow in its descent and predict where it will fall. This is an important part of his training.

7.​Hold two bean bags, one in each hand. Throw both bean bags in the air simultaneously and catch them when they come back down.

8.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and catch them with the opposite hands. Catch the bean bag thrown with the right hand in the left hand, and catch the bean bag thrown with the left hand in the right hand.

9.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and clap a rhythm pattern with hands (clap, clap, clap, pause, clap) before catching the bean bags.

10.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air, clap your hands, slap your legs, then catch the bean bags.

11.​Invent five new patters to clap, slap or stamp while throwing and catching the bean bags.

12.​Keep two bean bags in motion by throwing one up in the air, watching it reach the top of the trajectory, then throwing the other one up and so on.

13.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences, for example left –2, right –1. Continue the sequence at least 10 times.

14.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences that include left, right and both hands. Left –2, right –1, both -2. Repeat 10 times.

For a how to make bean bags video and downloads with more activities visit my website www.braingymdublin.net click on the red button called Free  christmas gift on the home page to take you to the video and down loads.

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Transitional Words and Phrases

Major levels of linguistic structure

Major levels of linguistic structure (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Transitional Words and Phrases


Transitional words and phrases provide the glue that holds ideas together in writing. They provide coherence (that hanging together, making sense as a whole) by helping the reader to understand the relationship between ideas, and they act as signposts that help the reader follow the movement of the discussion. Transitional expressions, then, can be used between sentences, between paragraphs, or between entire sections of a work. The two kinds of transitions are those of logic and those of thought. Each of these kinds is discussed here.

Transitions of Logic

Transitions of logic consist of words or phrases that convey “logical intent”: that is, they show the logical connection between two ideas. Since there are several possible logical connections (such as time, purpose, contrast), there are several categories of transitions of logic. The table below lists many of these transitions, arranged by category and listed as milder or stronger. (Note that there is some double listing, because of the different ways words can be used.) Some hints for use:

  • be careful not to use too many strong transitions
  • transitions become stronger when they are the first word in a sentence, milder when they are moved a few words into the sentence
  • keep this list handy while you write, until the words come automatically
Transitions of Logic
Milder Stronger
Addition a further x
and
and then
then
also
too
next
another
other
nor
further
furthermore
moreover
in addition
additionally
besides
again
equally important
first, second
finally, last
Comparison just as … so too
a similar x
another x like
similarly
comparable
in the same way
likewise
Contrast but
yet
and yet
still
otherwise
or
though
but another
rather
however
still
nevertheless
on the other hand
on the contrary
even so
notwithstanding
for all that
in contrast
alternatively
at the same time
though this may be
otherwise
instead
nonetheless
conversely
Time then
now
soon
afterward
later
shortly
earlier
recently
first, second, third
next
before
after
today
tomorrow
meanwhile
at length
presently
at last
finally
immediately
thereafter
at that time
subsequently
eventually
currently
in the meantime
in the past
in the future
Purpose to do this
so that
to this end
with this object
for this purpose
for that reason
because of this x
Place there
here
beyond
nearby
next to
at that point
opposite to
adjacent to
on the other side
in the front
in the back
Result so
and so
then
hence
therefore
accordingly
consequently
thus
thereupon
as a result
in consequence
Example that is
specifically
in particular
for one thing
for example
for instance
an instance of this
this can be seen in
Summary and Emphasis in sum
generally
after all
by the way
in general
incidentally
naturally
I hope
at least
it seems
in brief
I suppose
in short
on the whole
as I said
in other words
to be sure
in fact
indeed
clearly
of course
anyway
remarkably
I think
assuredly
definitely
without doubt
for all that
on the whole
in any event
importantly
certainly

Transitions of Thought

Transitions of thought consist of words that help maintain the continuity of thought from one sentence or paragraph to the next. Transitions of thought are produced by the following techniques:

Pronouns and Possessive Pronouns. Follow a noun with a pronoun (to continue the same subject) or a possessive pronoun (to move to something related to the original subject).
Fido is asleep. He is a good dog. His house is near the tree.
The oranges are in the kitchen bowl. Eat all you want, but check them for ripeness first.
The Castells must be home from the beach. I see their car in the driveway.

Pronouns include he, she, it, we, they, us, them, him, her, I, me, and you
Possessive pronouns include his, her, hers, its, their, theirs, ours, our, my, mine, your, yours

Keyword Repetition. Repeat the word around which the discussion is focusing.
Many cities are overcrowded. But now there is help for the city.
Your gardener can apply this fertilizer to your lawn monthly. Just read the fertilizer label. OR Just ask your gardener about it. OR Your lawn will become greener and juicier.

Synonyms. A synonym is a word that means nearly the same as another word. The meaning is close enough so that the thought continues, but different enough so that the idea expands and gains greater definition than it would by simply repeating the same word over and over (which would be pretty boring, too, huh?).
Fred’s car is fast and powerful. But is such a vehicle legal? And don’t hot rods like that pollute the air?
We hiked from the meadow to the peak on Monday. Then we walked from the peak to the bluff Tuesday. It was quite a trek.

Demonstrative Pronouns and Adjectives. Demonstrative pronouns include this, that, these, and those. They are useful for both direction and emphasis. It is a good idea to change demonstrative pronouns to demonstrative adjectives by adding a clarifying noun (so instead of saying, “This is good,” say, “This ice cream is good.”).
Some people suggest giving up salt on popcorn. This idea, however, is ridiculous.
Yes, Air Profit is our best selling shoe. That brand, however, is sold out right now.

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