What is the Disability Access Route to Education?

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The Disability Access Route to Education (DARE)

Click below for full site link

http://accesscollege.ie/dare/index.php

The Disability Access Route to Education (DARE) is a college and university admissions scheme which offers places on a reduced points basis to school leavers under 23 years old with disabilities who have completed an Irish Leaving Certificate. DARE has been set up by a number of colleges and universities as evidence shows that disability can have a negative effect on how well a student does at school and whether they go on to college.

Who is it for?

DARE is for school leavers who have the ability to benefit from and succeed in higher education but who may not be able to meet the points for their preferred course due to the impact of their disability.

Click here for information on language exemptions »

DARE News

Application Advice Videos for entry 2014 available now inDownloads Section

Application Advice Clinics are coming to a venue near you on 11th January – click here for details

http://accesscollege.ie/dare/index.php

Dyslexia and Stress

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Dyslexia and Stress

All dyslexic children experience varying degrees of stress at school, doing their homework,
and even at out­of­school activities they attend. School presents a special challenge, when so
much of their day is focused on dealing with text. For children whose dyslexia is severe it can
be as stressful as a one­legged child going to a skiing or dance school.
The dyslexic child knows that something is wrong, but cannot understand why they find it so
hard to do the work that other children can cope with easily. They often can become very
stressed.
Signs of stress
The signs of stress in children are well known nowadays: embarrassment, anxiety,
withdrawal, not wanting to go to school, tiredness, irritability, headaches or stomach aches,
difficulty sleeping, lying, thumb sucking, fingernail biting, loss of appetite, bed wetting, or need
to urinate frequently.
They may feel a sinking feeling on Sunday evenings because of school next day.
Teenagers may have sleep disturbances, may go off by themselves, may feel angry longer,
feel disillusioned, lack self­esteem, and have a general distrust of the world. Extreme
behaviours may result, ranging from breaking all of the rules and taking part in high­risk
behaviours (drugs, shoplifting, and skipping school) to depression and suicidal tendencies in
extreme cases.

Coping Strategies:

Help children through made­up stories
Sometimes children cannot talk to us about the anxiety they feel. They may not have the
words to express themselves. Homespun, made­up stories are a great answer. The
character in the story can be a boy or girl just like them. They are worried about the same
things and have the same problems to deal with. In the story, the boy or girl finds ways of
coping with problems which worry the child: reading, writing and spelling. As the child listens
to the story, s/he is able to identify with the hero or heroine.
You can ask them, “What do you think David (the boy in the story) was most worried about?”
The answer that the child gives will be a direct reflection of the child’s own fears, or anger.
Children can be very honest about the feelings and fears of story characters even though they
may be reluctant when asked about their own feelings.

Teaching slow breathing

In school, children can start to breathe too fast as a spelling test approaches. This can be like
a panic attack coming on. You can teach your child to sense when this reaction is starting and
learn to control their breathing. If they start taking deep breaths, then count to four before each new intake of breath, they will find that their body begins to relax and they are able to
fend off the feelings of panic.

Cognitive Therapy

Cognitive therapy helps us to stop fearing the worst. Ask your child what would happen if
they did fail the spelling test. Would they be expelled? Would they die? Of course not, the
worst that might happen would be if they were made to stay in at break time, but they would
probably get away with being told to work harder by the teacher. This realisation can take the
panic out of the situation.

Private tuition

The most significant help that can be given to any dyslexic child or teenager is to let them see
that they can progress in reading and writing. This usually means hiring a private tutor for
one­on­one help for a lesson each week. The tutor will take them back to the level at which
they are actually able to cope, and then lead them on very gradually from there.
Individual tuition always brings about a remarkable change in a dyslexic child’s self­
confidence and in their progress. They will often say: ‘Oh, I see now!’ after years of not
understanding in class. Small group support in school is also very helpful, but not as much as
one­on­one help if it can be afforded.
It’s a bit like learning to use the computer keyboard, but having missed out on how to use
the DELETE key. Everyone else seems to be getting on so much faster than you are!
Individual tuition fills in those missing steps in learning which make such a crucial difference.

Self ­confidence exercise

The child is asked to make two lists, one of things s/he is good at, and the other of things
that s/he is weak at. The ‘good at’ list is added to so that the child’s non­academic skills are
included: swimming, horse rising, cycling, modelling, collecting stamps, relating to other
children, being helpful at home, etc. The ‘weak at’ list has reading, spelling, writing, and
perhaps math, but always ends up shorter than the ‘good at’ list.
Read with your child at home
Whilst reading at school can be demanding for a child, reading at home can be an altogether
different experience provided that the parents use the right techniques. Methods for hearing
your child read are described in an article HEARING YOUR CHILD READ  The parent tells
the child any hard words straight away so that the child can get on with the story and start
to enjoy reading. As soon as the child shows any signs of frustration, the parent take over and
reads the whole of the next page or two.

Praise children

Every child is good at something, so make a lot of this. Put their certificates, badges, models,
etc. in a prominent place in the house for visitors to see. Don’t be afraid to do this ­ every
parent is proud of their children!
Using a number of techniques like these can really help your child to learn to cope with the
stress in their daily lives at school.

Tips on how to teach your dyslexic child to read.

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Dyslexics have difficulty recalling words.

As soon as your child has learned enough common sight words if they continue reading very easy books every day they will usually be able to recall the words they have learned and gradually build up a reading vocabulary.

If your child reads only now and then, they will forget the words, begin substituting others, become discouraged and make little progress.
Easy going love may lead a parent to neglect daily reading.

There are so many things that make it difficult to read daily your child wants to play, they have homework, birthday parties, play dates, the list goes on and on. If your dyslexic child’s reading is often neglected, they assume it is unimportant and cease to cooperate.
To teach your dyslexic child to read, you must have proper materials and know-how, but most of all you must have tough love. Love strong enough to enable you to find the time every single day to help your child to read.

Reading must be part of your child’s daily routine the same as brushing teeth, having breakfast or getting up in the morning.

 

Choosing a book.

Use the 5 finger rule to determine if the book is “just right”

1. Open a book to any page.

2. Start reading the page.
3. Hold up one finger for EVERY word that you don’t know or have 
trouble pronouncing.

 
0-1 Fingers 
The book is too EASY.
2-3 Fingers 
The book is at the Interest level.
4 Fingers 
The book is at the Challenge level. You can try it ~ be sure it makes sense.

5 Fingers 
The book is at the Frustration level and is not a good choice for now.

 

 
How to do paired Reading.

  • Read aloud from the book with your child.
  • When your child taps your hand, let them read alone as you follow along silently.
  • If your child reads a word wrong, skips a word, or doesn’t know a word the use the 5 second rule, count five then.
  1. Point to the word.
  2. Tell them the word
  3. Have them repeat the word
  4. Join them in reading aloud again

 

Talk about the story.

 

  • What do you think it’s about?
  • What happened?
  • Who are the main characters?
  • What do you think will happen next?
  • If the book is too hard (5 words wrong in 100) change the book.

You must be enthusiastic and supportive. Daily practice brings success!

Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration. Eye Tracking

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Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration.
Eye Tracking

Materials: Hidden picture magazines and games like where’s Waldo? also, Highlights, magazine offers a lot of hidden picture activities.

Method: Have the child do the activities below.

Levels 1 to 2: Use the Highlight, magazines or where’s Waldo? Books.

Levels 3 to 5: Use normal reading material. Designate a letter (for example, R) and ask the child to look at the page of print and circle as many R’s as he can. Vary the letters he is to find. Time him and see how fast he can find the designated letter. You can vary this and ask him to find blends or circle all the words with “tion” in them or that end with “ing).

Letter Search

Materials: Normal reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 2 to 5: The child is to circle all words where a letter appears twice. This can be varied by finding words with three letters or words where there are no letters that appear more than once. For younger children, use large print books. The child is to scan to a left to right direction on each line of print. He is not to randomly search or use his finger as a marker to keep his place.

Words in Words

Materials: Reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 3 to 5: Have the child find as many words as he can that are hidden in other words. For example many = man; other = the.

One Foot Hop

Materials: None.

Method: Have the child do the following activities.

Level 1:

Have the child hop in place on one leg, hop four steps forward, four steps backward, hop to the left, hop to the right, hop in place and turn around.
Repeat with opposite foot.

Level 2:

Hop while grasping the ankle with the opposite hand behind the back.
Hop while grasping the leg in front of the body with both hands.
The child should try to do at least 10 hops across the room on each foot.

Coordination between left and right.
Stepping Stones:

Materials: Different coloured tile or carpet cut into 4 inch squares (have 20 squares – 10 of one colour and 10 of another colour).

Method: The child is to walk on the squares. He is to keep his body straight and have good posture.

Level 1: Put the squares in a straight line. The child is to walk on them and keep his balance.

Level 2:

Arrange the squares slightly off centre with one colour on the right of centre and the other on the left of centre. For example:

R B
R B
R B

Have the child walk on the squares and call out the side that is stepping on the square. For example, each time he steps on the blue square, he calls out “right” and each time he steps on the red square, he calls out “left”.

Put the squares in various patterns that make up letters or numbers. Have the child walk on the patterns and tell you which letter or number it is.

Pattern Hopping

Materials: None.

Method: The child will do the following activities.

Level 1:

The child stands in front of you, arms at his side. Have him hop up and down. Make sure both is feet leave and touch the floor at the same time.
Have him hop across the room on one foot. Have him do it first with his right foot and then hop back on his left foot.

Level 2:

Clap a pattern and have him hop to the pattern. For example, one clap, pause and two quick claps would be one hop, pause and two quick hops. Have him do this first on both feet, then on one foot.
Do #1, but have the child facing away from you as so he cannot see you clapping.

Level 3: Have the child facing you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, clap, pause, clap, and clap, clap would be right, left, pause, and right, left, right.

Level 4: Have the child facing away from you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet and call out which foot he is hopping on as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, pause, clap, clap, he would hop and call out “right”, pause, “left”, “right”.

Getting the kids to sleep on Christmas Eve

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Hearing Your Child Read

For an ‘untrained’ parent, hearing your child read can be a very frustrating experience.

Reading with your child at home can easily become very stressful if it is not handled correctly. It can cause great frustration if you feel that your child is not learning to read as fast as you expect, or if you have discovered that your child is dyslexic. This article will set out some guidelines which have proved extremely helpful to many parents.

The first point is to realize that reading a book together must be for pleasure, and is not the time to be stopping over difficult words and trying to work out what they say from the sounds of the letters.

If your child cannot read a word within a second or two then use the Golden Rule: just tell them the word and move on with the story. This goes against most parents’ instincts, but is the only way for the two of you to get on with the book and enjoy the story. When you read the book again the following evening, you will find that your child remembers more of the ‘difficult’ words you had to supply, and will improve each evening. The important thing is that your child is learning to be confident that you will always tell them a word which they do not know, and can trust that reading with you will be a pleasurable experience.

Unfortunately, the alternative scenario is all too well-known to us all: your child sees a difficult word, tenses up and makes a frantic effort to work it out. Meanwhile, you also tense up, feeling that your child will never learn to read!

Because of the history of the English spelling system, which has grown from lots of different sources, many words are impossible to work out from the sounds of their letters.

‘Cat’ is straightforward, as are ‘log’, ‘hit’, and ‘get’. But what about words like ‘though’? The spelling has no resemblance to the actual word that we say, and no-one can possibly know what the word says unless they are told. No-one can work out how to read words like ‘said’, ‘early’, ‘was’, ‘phone’ and thousands more from the sounds of their letters. Unfortunately we have inherited a highly irregular spelling system which we are stuck with!

However, with the growing confidence that you will always tell them a word they do not know, children do learn to read. You will notice them using other clues, like the pictures on the page, or guesses from the meaning of the sentence, and it is good to encourage them to use these clues. Provided that they have the opportunity to go over the same book on different evenings, they will gradually come to learn the new words in it, and to enjoy the story – which is what reading is all about!

Another simple method to make things easier is to share the reading with your child: read one sentence each (while still coming in straight away with any difficult words for your child). This will teach your child to look out for the next period/full stop, and will help them get an idea of what a sentence is.

Repetition of the same phrases also helps tremendously in the early stages, when your child knows that the same sentence will be repeated at each stage of the story.

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Is the homework getting lost at home?

Helping Children with Problems Turn In Their Homework

Here are some strategies to help a child who does his or her homework, but doesn’t turn it in:
Walk through the process with the child
Walk through the process with the child. For example:
There are many different ways that someone can get off-track in the process of getting homework from home to the teacher. Talk through the process with the student.
Is the homework getting lost at home? Is the homework getting lost in the bottom of the backpack or the bottom of the locker? Is it in the proper notebook, but forgotten in the process of settling into the classroom?
Once you have identified the sticking point, consider what needs to be added to the routine to get past it.
For those who lose track of homework at home, consider instituting the following routine (from Enabling Disorganized Students to Succeed, by Suzanne Stevens): “Homework is not done until your homework is in its proper folder or notebook, the folders and notebooks are packed into your backpack, and your backpack is on its launching pad.”
Try different ways of organizing homework to find the one that best suits your child. Some students do best with a separate homework folder so that everything that needs to be turned in is organized into one place. Others do better when they organize the homework by subject.
If the teachers have set up a system that does not work for your child, talk with them about allowing alternatives. This can also be done as part of a formal individualized plan, like a 504 plan.
Develop templates of repetitive procedures
Develop templates of repetitive procedures. For example:
Teachers can create a checklist of things to be done upon entering or leaving the classroom.
Parents can create written checklists or photo charts for completing chores, preparing to catch the bus in the morning, gathering necessary stuff for sports practice, etc.
Provide accommodations
Provide accommodations. For example:
Involve your child’s teacher(s) in building in reminders until the desired pattern of behavior (e.g., turning in homework as soon as the student walks into the classroom) becomes a habit.
Teachers understandably balk at the idea of taking on responsibility for your child’s job of turning in his work. However, repeated performance of a behavior is what makes it a habit; once the behavior is automatic, then the burden is lifted from the executive system.
If you help the teacher to see this as a step in the process of building independent skills, with the prospect of fading out the teacher’s prompting, it may encourage the teacher to get on board.
Teach the use of tricks and technology that help compensate for organizational weaknesses
Teach the use of tricks and technology that help compensate for organizational weaknesses. For example:
If the agenda book is the primary organizing tool for tracking assignments, it could also serve as a way to remind the student to turn in assignments.
For example, after completing an assignment, the student could be taught to enter a note into the next day’s assignments block for that subject. Then, at the end of class, when the student enters that night’s homework assignment, he will see the reminder to turn in what is due that day.
Several versions of watches are available that can be set to vibrate and show a reminder phrase at the programmed time.
“Turn in homework” can be a programmed reminder set to go off at the beginning or end of the class period. Cell phones often have an alarm function, as well, that can be set for reminder alarms.
If this trick works for your child, talk to your child’s teachers about allowing cell phones in the classroom for this explicit function only.
When the student prints out an assignment at home, prompt the child to also email it to the teacher and the child’s own web-based email account. Then, if the hard copy is misplaced, the child can print it out during class (with the teacher’s permission) or during free time.
Try this!
Few problems are as frustrating for parents and kids as not receiving credit for homework that was actually completed on time but never turned in!
One tried and true behavioral strategy to remedy this is to link an already established habit to one that your child needs help acquiring.
To illustrate, Ivan is a seventh grader who forgets almost everything – except his peanut butter and jelly sandwich! – when he leaves home in the morning to catch the school bus. With daily reminders from his parents, he puts his homework folder on top of his lunch in the refrigerator before going to bed each school night. Then, putting the folder in his backpack, along with his PB&J, is a “no-brainer.” Ivan not only gets credit for his completed work but also learns how to creatively generate ways to manage his weaknesses.
Reprinted with permission from pp. 170-172 of Late, Lost, and Unprepared by Joyce Cooper-Kahn, Ph.D. & Laurie Dietzel, Ph.D. Published by Woodbine House, 6510 Bells Mill Road, Bethesda, MD 20817. 800-843-7323 http://www.woodbinehouse.com.

By: Joyce Cooper-Kahn and Laurie Dietzel (2008)

For one to one consultation Phone Fiona 085 145494

Visit my web site for further information.

www.braingymdublin.net

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Bean bag activities

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Bean bags are particularly well adapted for developing the ability to throw and catch objects. Small children and children with motor or visual difficulties can play successfully with a bean bag when it would be impossible for them to play with a ball. The child is able to catch the bean bag by just getting his hand in front of it whereas he has to coordinate his grasp to a much greater extent to catch a ball. If he misses the bean bag, it hits the ground and slides to a stop in a short distance. If he misses the ball, it bounces and rolls and the child has to chase it. Therefore the bean bag is much less frustrating.
1.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and catch it when it comes down.

2.​Throw the bean bag up and make it just touch the ceiling. Then throw it up and make it come as close to the ceiling as you can without touching the ceiling.

3.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your right foot when it comes down.

4.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your left foot when it comes down.

5.​Throw a bean bag up in the air. On the command “right”, “left”, or “both” catch the bean bag with the right hand, the left hand, or both hands.

6.​Throw the bean bag up in the air. When it reaches the top of its trajectory close your eyes. Try to catch the bean bag with your eyes closed. This activity requires the child to visualise the path that the bean bag will follow in its descent and predict where it will fall. This is an important part of his training.

7.​Hold two bean bags, one in each hand. Throw both bean bags in the air simultaneously and catch them when they come back down.

8.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and catch them with the opposite hands. Catch the bean bag thrown with the right hand in the left hand, and catch the bean bag thrown with the left hand in the right hand.

9.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and clap a rhythm pattern with hands (clap, clap, clap, pause, clap) before catching the bean bags.

10.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air, clap your hands, slap your legs, then catch the bean bags.

11.​Invent five new patters to clap, slap or stamp while throwing and catching the bean bags.

12.​Keep two bean bags in motion by throwing one up in the air, watching it reach the top of the trajectory, then throwing the other one up and so on.

13.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences, for example left –2, right –1. Continue the sequence at least 10 times.

14.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences that include left, right and both hands. Left –2, right –1, both -2. Repeat 10 times.

For a how to make bean bags video and downloads with more activities visit my website www.braingymdublin.net click on the red button called Free  christmas gift on the home page to take you to the video and down loads.

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Websites to help with Dyslexia.

Visual-dyslexia

Visual-dyslexia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

www.mrsperkins.com

 

www.readingquest.org

 

www.gingersoftware.com

 

www.starfall.com.

 

www.theschoolhouse.us.

 

http://www.cherylsigmon.com/handouts.asp

 

www.funbrain.com.

 

www.enchantedlearning.com.