Bean bag activities

Bean bag activities

BY FIONA ON FEBRUARY 15, 2012

Bean bags

Bean bags are particularly well adapted for developing the ability to throw and catch objects. Small children and children with motor or visual difficulties can play successfully with a bean bag when it would be impossible for them to play with a ball. The child is able to catch the bean bag by just getting his hand in front of it whereas he has to coordinate his grasp to a much greater extent to catch a ball. If he misses the bean bag, it hits the ground and slides to a stop in a short distance. If he misses the ball, it bounces and rolls and the child has to chase it. Therefore the bean bag is much less frustrating.
1.Throw the bean bag up in the air and catch it when it comes down.

2.Throw the bean bag up and make it just touch the ceiling. Then throw it up and make it come as close to the ceiling as you can without touching the ceiling.

3.Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your right foot when it comes down.

4.Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your left foot when it comes down.

5.Throw a bean bag up in the air. On the command “right”, “left”, or “both” catch the bean bag with the right hand, the left hand, or both hands.

6.Throw the bean bag up in the air. When it reaches the top of its trajectory close your eyes. Try to catch the bean bag with your eyes closed. This activity requires the child to visualise the path that the bean bag will follow in its descent and predict where it will fall. This is an important part of his training.

7.Hold two bean bags, one in each hand. Throw both bean bags in the air simultaneously and catch them when they come back down.

8.Throw the two bean bags up in the air and catch them with the opposite hands. Catch the bean bag thrown with the right hand in the left hand, and catch the bean bag thrown with the left hand in the right hand.

9.Throw the two bean bags up in the air and clap a rhythm pattern with hands (clap, clap, clap, pause, clap) before catching the bean bags.

10.Throw the two bean bags up in the air, clap your hands, slap your legs, then catch the bean bags.

11.Invent five new patters to clap, slap or stamp while throwing and catching the bean bags.

12.Keep two bean bags in motion by throwing one up in the air, watching it reach the top of the trajectory, then throwing the other one up and so on.

13.Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences, for example left –2, right –1. Continue the sequence at least 10 times.

14.Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences that include left, right and both hands. Left –2, right –1, both -2. Repeat 10 times.

 

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Bean bag activities

mail.google.combean bagsb bag presentBean bags

Bean bags are particularly well adapted for developing the ability to throw and catch objects. Small children and children with motor or visual difficulties can play successfully with a bean bag when it would be impossible for them to play with a ball. The child is able to catch the bean bag by just getting his hand in front of it whereas he has to coordinate his grasp to a much greater extent to catch a ball. If he misses the bean bag, it hits the ground and slides to a stop in a short distance. If he misses the ball, it bounces and rolls and the child has to chase it. Therefore the bean bag is much less frustrating.
1.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and catch it when it comes down.

2.​Throw the bean bag up and make it just touch the ceiling. Then throw it up and make it come as close to the ceiling as you can without touching the ceiling.

3.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your right foot when it comes down.

4.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your left foot when it comes down.

5.​Throw a bean bag up in the air. On the command “right”, “left”, or “both” catch the bean bag with the right hand, the left hand, or both hands.

6.​Throw the bean bag up in the air. When it reaches the top of its trajectory close your eyes. Try to catch the bean bag with your eyes closed. This activity requires the child to visualise the path that the bean bag will follow in its descent and predict where it will fall. This is an important part of his training.

7.​Hold two bean bags, one in each hand. Throw both bean bags in the air simultaneously and catch them when they come back down.

8.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and catch them with the opposite hands. Catch the bean bag thrown with the right hand in the left hand, and catch the bean bag thrown with the left hand in the right hand.

9.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and clap a rhythm pattern with hands (clap, clap, clap, pause, clap) before catching the bean bags.

10.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air, clap your hands, slap your legs, then catch the bean bags.

11.​Invent five new patters to clap, slap or stamp while throwing and catching the bean bags.

12.​Keep two bean bags in motion by throwing one up in the air, watching it reach the top of the trajectory, then throwing the other one up and so on.

13.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences, for example left –2, right –1. Continue the sequence at least 10 times.

14.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences that include left, right and both hands. Left –2, right –1, both -2. Repeat 10 times.

For a how to make bean bags video and downloads with more activities visit my website www.braingymdublin.net click on the red button called Free  christmas gift on the home page to take you to the video and down loads.

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For one to one consultations phone 085 1445494 (Dublin)

An explanation for children with dyslexia.

 

An explanation for children with dyslexia.

Lots and lots have been written for parents and teachers about dyslexia so I thought it was time to write something for you.

You are not the only one that has problems learning to read, write, spell, write stories and do sums. Lots of people all over the world (including me) have had problems for years and years long before you were born. We were often told that we were lazy or stupid or that we didn’t try hard enough.

Things are different now although you have the same problems today now lots of people understand, and can show you that you are not stupid or lazy and you try just as hard as everyone else and sometimes harder! And that you can do it.

All you need is a little bit of help to learn in a different way, and you can do very well if you are just shown how.

I used to find it very difficult to copy from the blackboard.

I would look up to start at the beginning, and then look down to see where I should write on my page. When I would look up again I would have lost my place, so I would have to find it again. I found this very tricky. Sometimes I would be gone back to the wrong line, and I would get into a terrible muddle. I would find it very tiring and slow.

Sometimes my teacher would tell me to hurry up and not to be lazy. The trouble was that I was not being lazy. I was working very hard and sometimes it made me cross and sometimes it made me sad.

I found it very hard to learn to read. Sometimes I would see a word but I wouldn’t remember it for very long. When I would see the word again I would have forgotten what it was. I now know this was because a small part of my memory wasn’t working very well. It was nobody’s fault it is just the way it is.

I still get my letters back to front and write b for d and p for q. It’s very confusing. T for f u for n all round the wrong way. It is because I find it hard to see the difference, and hard to remember which way they go.

Writing backwards is something I still do sometimes when I am tired.  I think that’s very clever not everyone can do it, but it does get muddling. Maybe I hear it backwards?

I can do sums very well but sometimes I get them wrong because I might put 12 for 21 and ut for tu. It’s not my fault it’s just that I get things jumbled sometimes.

Sometimes I get it hard to remember all the things that I have been asked to do. I would sometimes get into trouble for not listening. Not fair is it?

I always found spelling impossible to learn. However hard I tried I always seamed to get them wrong.

Do you ever feel like that?

Well, how do we sort out these problems?

First of all, it is a good idea to go with your Mum and Dad to see someone who really understands your problems. You will play a few games, and answer a few questions some of the things you will find easy and some of the things you will find hard. That’s o.k. That’s how it should be.

When you have finished, your Mum and Dad may go in and have a chat to find out the beat way to help you.

After that you may have a special; lesson each week with a special teacher. You will be able to tell her about all the things that worry you and she will understand your particular problems.

Soon you will see that you are much better at some things than most people, and that the bits that were difficult
not quite so difficult any more.

You will probably still get your bs and ds mixed up sometimes (like me) but not nearly as often as before. Reading and writing will be easier too. You will stop worrying so much, because you know that someone understands. Instead of getting things wrong you will be getting things right!

There is nothing wrong with you. All you need is a different way to learn and you will learn very well.

Just you wait and see.

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Brain Gym Dublin

085 1445494 (Dublin)

Help your child with learning difficulties.

Learning Difficulties (parents help)

"Parenting"

“Parenting” (Photo credit: Carol VanHook)

During this one to one consultation I can help parents  develop a common and consistent approach to their children. This consultation focuses on providing parents with specific skills, introduces them to new resources and strategies to address their child’s learning problems.

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Phone  085 1445494 (Dublin)

Bean bag activities

Bean bags

Bean bags are particularly well adapted for developing the ability to throw and catch objects. Small children and children with motor or visual difficulties can play successfully with a bean bag when it would be impossible for them to play with a ball. The child is able to catch the bean bag by just getting his hand in front of it whereas he has to coordinate his grasp to a much greater extent to catch a ball. If he misses the bean bag, it hits the ground and slides to a stop in a short distance. If he misses the ball, it bounces and rolls and the child has to chase it. Therefore the bean bag is much less frustrating.
1.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and catch it when it comes down.

2.​Throw the bean bag up and make it just touch the ceiling. Then throw it up and make it come as close to the ceiling as you can without touching the ceiling.

3.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your right foot when it comes down.

4.​Throw the bean bag up in the air and try to touch it with your left foot when it comes down.

5.​Throw a bean bag up in the air. On the command “right”, “left”, or “both” catch the bean bag with the right hand, the left hand, or both hands.

6.​Throw the bean bag up in the air. When it reaches the top of its trajectory close your eyes. Try to catch the bean bag with your eyes closed. This activity requires the child to visualise the path that the bean bag will follow in its descent and predict where it will fall. This is an important part of his training.

7.​Hold two bean bags, one in each hand. Throw both bean bags in the air simultaneously and catch them when they come back down.

8.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and catch them with the opposite hands. Catch the bean bag thrown with the right hand in the left hand, and catch the bean bag thrown with the left hand in the right hand.

9.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air and clap a rhythm pattern with hands (clap, clap, clap, pause, clap) before catching the bean bags.

10.​Throw the two bean bags up in the air, clap your hands, slap your legs, then catch the bean bags.

11.​Invent five new patters to clap, slap or stamp while throwing and catching the bean bags.

12.​Keep two bean bags in motion by throwing one up in the air, watching it reach the top of the trajectory, then throwing the other one up and so on.

13.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences, for example left –2, right –1. Continue the sequence at least 10 times.

14.​Throw the bean bags in rhythmic sequences that include left, right and both hands. Left –2, right –1, both -2. Repeat 10 times.

Visit www.braingymdublin.net for how to video and free activity downloads.

Click red free gift button on home page.

Don’t forget to share if you like this post ;)

For one to one consultations phone 085 1445494 (Dublin)