Setting Smart Goals.

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Having goals plays a large part in how happy (and unhappy ) we are.
When we are successful in achieving or moving towards our goals we are happier.

On the other hand we may feel blocked or stuck and unmotivated to achieve the goals we have set for ourselves.
Goals need to be structured much like any project I.e. if you want to paint a room you will have a structure around it , choose the color get the paint, brushes etc prepare the room and so on.

Think about the terms.
1.What is my goal
2.What are the rules for achieving that goal.
3.What skills do I need to achieve my goal?
When a goal is structured in this way it is engaged in differently.
Allow yourself success by setting small achievable goals.A goal can be set on a daily basis.

  • Take the stairs instead of the lift
  • Get up ten minutes earlier
  • Make real tea in a tea pot with real tea leafs the ritual is very calming.

Small goals give instant feedback, they lift our mood and have a lasting effect on our lives.

 

Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration. Eye Tracking

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Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration.
Eye Tracking

Materials: Hidden picture magazines and games like where’s Waldo? also, Highlights, magazine offers a lot of hidden picture activities.

Method: Have the child do the activities below.

Levels 1 to 2: Use the Highlight, magazines or where’s Waldo? Books.

Levels 3 to 5: Use normal reading material. Designate a letter (for example, R) and ask the child to look at the page of print and circle as many R’s as he can. Vary the letters he is to find. Time him and see how fast he can find the designated letter. You can vary this and ask him to find blends or circle all the words with “tion” in them or that end with “ing).

Letter Search

Materials: Normal reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 2 to 5: The child is to circle all words where a letter appears twice. This can be varied by finding words with three letters or words where there are no letters that appear more than once. For younger children, use large print books. The child is to scan to a left to right direction on each line of print. He is not to randomly search or use his finger as a marker to keep his place.

Words in Words

Materials: Reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 3 to 5: Have the child find as many words as he can that are hidden in other words. For example many = man; other = the.

One Foot Hop

Materials: None.

Method: Have the child do the following activities.

Level 1:

Have the child hop in place on one leg, hop four steps forward, four steps backward, hop to the left, hop to the right, hop in place and turn around.
Repeat with opposite foot.

Level 2:

Hop while grasping the ankle with the opposite hand behind the back.
Hop while grasping the leg in front of the body with both hands.
The child should try to do at least 10 hops across the room on each foot.

Coordination between left and right.
Stepping Stones:

Materials: Different coloured tile or carpet cut into 4 inch squares (have 20 squares – 10 of one colour and 10 of another colour).

Method: The child is to walk on the squares. He is to keep his body straight and have good posture.

Level 1: Put the squares in a straight line. The child is to walk on them and keep his balance.

Level 2:

Arrange the squares slightly off centre with one colour on the right of centre and the other on the left of centre. For example:

R B
R B
R B

Have the child walk on the squares and call out the side that is stepping on the square. For example, each time he steps on the blue square, he calls out “right” and each time he steps on the red square, he calls out “left”.

Put the squares in various patterns that make up letters or numbers. Have the child walk on the patterns and tell you which letter or number it is.

Pattern Hopping

Materials: None.

Method: The child will do the following activities.

Level 1:

The child stands in front of you, arms at his side. Have him hop up and down. Make sure both is feet leave and touch the floor at the same time.
Have him hop across the room on one foot. Have him do it first with his right foot and then hop back on his left foot.

Level 2:

Clap a pattern and have him hop to the pattern. For example, one clap, pause and two quick claps would be one hop, pause and two quick hops. Have him do this first on both feet, then on one foot.
Do #1, but have the child facing away from you as so he cannot see you clapping.

Level 3: Have the child facing you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, clap, pause, clap, and clap, clap would be right, left, pause, and right, left, right.

Level 4: Have the child facing away from you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet and call out which foot he is hopping on as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, pause, clap, clap, he would hop and call out “right”, pause, “left”, “right”.

Getting the kids to sleep on Christmas Eve

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Setting Smart Goals.

mail.google.com99

Having goals plays a large part in how happy (and unhappy ) we are.
When we are successful in achieving or moving towards our goals we are happier.

On the other hand we may feel blocked or stuck and unmotivated to achieve the goals we have set for ourselves.
Goals need to be structured much like any project I.e. if you want to paint a room you will have a structure around it , choose the color get the paint, brushes etc prepare the room and so on.

Think about the terms.
1.What is my goal
2.What are the rules for achieving that goal.
3.What skills do I need to achieve my goal?
When a goal is structured in this way it is engaged in differently.
Allow yourself success by setting small achievable goals.A goal can be set on a daily basis.

  • Take the stairs instead of the lift
  • Get up ten minutes earlier
  • Make real tea in a tea pot with real tea leafs the ritual is very calming.

Small goals give instant feedback, they lift our mood and have a lasting effect on our lives.
Fiona Phelan 085 1445494

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www.braingymdublin.net

 

 

Is the homework getting lost at home?

Helping Children with Problems Turn In Their Homework

Here are some strategies to help a child who does his or her homework, but doesn’t turn it in:
Walk through the process with the child
Walk through the process with the child. For example:
There are many different ways that someone can get off-track in the process of getting homework from home to the teacher. Talk through the process with the student.
Is the homework getting lost at home? Is the homework getting lost in the bottom of the backpack or the bottom of the locker? Is it in the proper notebook, but forgotten in the process of settling into the classroom?
Once you have identified the sticking point, consider what needs to be added to the routine to get past it.
For those who lose track of homework at home, consider instituting the following routine (from Enabling Disorganized Students to Succeed, by Suzanne Stevens): “Homework is not done until your homework is in its proper folder or notebook, the folders and notebooks are packed into your backpack, and your backpack is on its launching pad.”
Try different ways of organizing homework to find the one that best suits your child. Some students do best with a separate homework folder so that everything that needs to be turned in is organized into one place. Others do better when they organize the homework by subject.
If the teachers have set up a system that does not work for your child, talk with them about allowing alternatives. This can also be done as part of a formal individualized plan, like a 504 plan.
Develop templates of repetitive procedures
Develop templates of repetitive procedures. For example:
Teachers can create a checklist of things to be done upon entering or leaving the classroom.
Parents can create written checklists or photo charts for completing chores, preparing to catch the bus in the morning, gathering necessary stuff for sports practice, etc.
Provide accommodations
Provide accommodations. For example:
Involve your child’s teacher(s) in building in reminders until the desired pattern of behavior (e.g., turning in homework as soon as the student walks into the classroom) becomes a habit.
Teachers understandably balk at the idea of taking on responsibility for your child’s job of turning in his work. However, repeated performance of a behavior is what makes it a habit; once the behavior is automatic, then the burden is lifted from the executive system.
If you help the teacher to see this as a step in the process of building independent skills, with the prospect of fading out the teacher’s prompting, it may encourage the teacher to get on board.
Teach the use of tricks and technology that help compensate for organizational weaknesses
Teach the use of tricks and technology that help compensate for organizational weaknesses. For example:
If the agenda book is the primary organizing tool for tracking assignments, it could also serve as a way to remind the student to turn in assignments.
For example, after completing an assignment, the student could be taught to enter a note into the next day’s assignments block for that subject. Then, at the end of class, when the student enters that night’s homework assignment, he will see the reminder to turn in what is due that day.
Several versions of watches are available that can be set to vibrate and show a reminder phrase at the programmed time.
“Turn in homework” can be a programmed reminder set to go off at the beginning or end of the class period. Cell phones often have an alarm function, as well, that can be set for reminder alarms.
If this trick works for your child, talk to your child’s teachers about allowing cell phones in the classroom for this explicit function only.
When the student prints out an assignment at home, prompt the child to also email it to the teacher and the child’s own web-based email account. Then, if the hard copy is misplaced, the child can print it out during class (with the teacher’s permission) or during free time.
Try this!
Few problems are as frustrating for parents and kids as not receiving credit for homework that was actually completed on time but never turned in!
One tried and true behavioral strategy to remedy this is to link an already established habit to one that your child needs help acquiring.
To illustrate, Ivan is a seventh grader who forgets almost everything – except his peanut butter and jelly sandwich! – when he leaves home in the morning to catch the school bus. With daily reminders from his parents, he puts his homework folder on top of his lunch in the refrigerator before going to bed each school night. Then, putting the folder in his backpack, along with his PB&J, is a “no-brainer.” Ivan not only gets credit for his completed work but also learns how to creatively generate ways to manage his weaknesses.
Reprinted with permission from pp. 170-172 of Late, Lost, and Unprepared by Joyce Cooper-Kahn, Ph.D. & Laurie Dietzel, Ph.D. Published by Woodbine House, 6510 Bells Mill Road, Bethesda, MD 20817. 800-843-7323 http://www.woodbinehouse.com.

By: Joyce Cooper-Kahn and Laurie Dietzel (2008)

For one to one consultation Phone Fiona 085 145494

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Improve Focus and Concentration

ARM ACTIVATION

Arm Activation is an isometric self-help activity which lengthens the muscles of the upper chest and shoulders. Muscular control for both gross-motor and fine-motor activities originates in this area. If these muscles are shortened from tension, activities related to writing and the control of tools are inhibited.

TEACHING TIPS

• The student experiences her arms as they hang loosely at her sides.
• The student activates one arm as illustrated, while keeping her head relaxed. She then compares the two arms in terms of length, relaxation, and flexibility, before activating the other arm.
• Activation is done in four positions: away from the head, forward, backward, and toward the ear.
• The student may feel the arm activation all the way down to the ribcage.
• The student exhales on the activation, releasing the breath over eight or more counts.
• The student may notice increased relaxation, coordination, and vitality as arm tension is released.
• On completing the movement, the student rolls or shakes her shoulders, noticing the relaxation.

VARIATIONS

• Take more than one complete breath in each position of activation.
• While activating, reach up to further open the diaphragm.
• This can be done sitting, standing, or lying down.
• Arm Activations can be done in different arm positions (e.g., arm straight ahead, next to hip, behind the waist).

ACTIVATES THE BRAIN FOR

• expressive speech and language ability
• relaxed use of diaphragm and increased respiration
• eye-hand coordination and the manipulation of tools

ACADEMIC SKILLS

• penmanship and cursive writing
• creative writing

RELATED SKILLS

• operating machines (e.g., a word processor)

BEHAVIOURAL/POSTURAL CORRELATES

• an increased attention span for written work
• improved focus and concentration without overfocus
• improved breathing and a relaxed attitude
• an enhanced ability to express ideas
• increased energy in hands and fingers (relaxes writer’s cramp)

Brain Gym Dublin 085-1445494

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Help your child with learning difficulties.

Learning Difficulties (parents help)

"Parenting"

“Parenting” (Photo credit: Carol VanHook)

During this one to one consultation I can help parents  develop a common and consistent approach to their children. This consultation focuses on providing parents with specific skills, introduces them to new resources and strategies to address their child’s learning problems.

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Phone  085 1445494 (Dublin)