Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration. Eye Tracking

232323232-fp539-7-vq=;5;;-9;2-242-WSNRCG=35478;3279333vq0mrj

Exercises to help with learning difficulties and concentration.
Eye Tracking

Materials: Hidden picture magazines and games like where’s Waldo? also, Highlights, magazine offers a lot of hidden picture activities.

Method: Have the child do the activities below.

Levels 1 to 2: Use the Highlight, magazines or where’s Waldo? Books.

Levels 3 to 5: Use normal reading material. Designate a letter (for example, R) and ask the child to look at the page of print and circle as many R’s as he can. Vary the letters he is to find. Time him and see how fast he can find the designated letter. You can vary this and ask him to find blends or circle all the words with “tion” in them or that end with “ing).

Letter Search

Materials: Normal reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 2 to 5: The child is to circle all words where a letter appears twice. This can be varied by finding words with three letters or words where there are no letters that appear more than once. For younger children, use large print books. The child is to scan to a left to right direction on each line of print. He is not to randomly search or use his finger as a marker to keep his place.

Words in Words

Materials: Reading material.

Method: Have the child do the following activity.

Levels 3 to 5: Have the child find as many words as he can that are hidden in other words. For example many = man; other = the.

One Foot Hop

Materials: None.

Method: Have the child do the following activities.

Level 1:

Have the child hop in place on one leg, hop four steps forward, four steps backward, hop to the left, hop to the right, hop in place and turn around.
Repeat with opposite foot.

Level 2:

Hop while grasping the ankle with the opposite hand behind the back.
Hop while grasping the leg in front of the body with both hands.
The child should try to do at least 10 hops across the room on each foot.

Coordination between left and right.
Stepping Stones:

Materials: Different coloured tile or carpet cut into 4 inch squares (have 20 squares – 10 of one colour and 10 of another colour).

Method: The child is to walk on the squares. He is to keep his body straight and have good posture.

Level 1: Put the squares in a straight line. The child is to walk on them and keep his balance.

Level 2:

Arrange the squares slightly off centre with one colour on the right of centre and the other on the left of centre. For example:

R B
R B
R B

Have the child walk on the squares and call out the side that is stepping on the square. For example, each time he steps on the blue square, he calls out “right” and each time he steps on the red square, he calls out “left”.

Put the squares in various patterns that make up letters or numbers. Have the child walk on the patterns and tell you which letter or number it is.

Pattern Hopping

Materials: None.

Method: The child will do the following activities.

Level 1:

The child stands in front of you, arms at his side. Have him hop up and down. Make sure both is feet leave and touch the floor at the same time.
Have him hop across the room on one foot. Have him do it first with his right foot and then hop back on his left foot.

Level 2:

Clap a pattern and have him hop to the pattern. For example, one clap, pause and two quick claps would be one hop, pause and two quick hops. Have him do this first on both feet, then on one foot.
Do #1, but have the child facing away from you as so he cannot see you clapping.

Level 3: Have the child facing you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, clap, pause, clap, and clap, clap would be right, left, pause, and right, left, right.

Level 4: Have the child facing away from you. Clap a pattern. He is to alternate feet and call out which foot he is hopping on as he hops to the pattern. For example, clap, pause, clap, clap, he would hop and call out “right”, pause, “left”, “right”.

Advertisements

Improve Focus and Concentration

ARM ACTIVATION

Arm Activation is an isometric self-help activity which lengthens the muscles of the upper chest and shoulders. Muscular control for both gross-motor and fine-motor activities originates in this area. If these muscles are shortened from tension, activities related to writing and the control of tools are inhibited.

TEACHING TIPS

• The student experiences her arms as they hang loosely at her sides.
• The student activates one arm as illustrated, while keeping her head relaxed. She then compares the two arms in terms of length, relaxation, and flexibility, before activating the other arm.
• Activation is done in four positions: away from the head, forward, backward, and toward the ear.
• The student may feel the arm activation all the way down to the ribcage.
• The student exhales on the activation, releasing the breath over eight or more counts.
• The student may notice increased relaxation, coordination, and vitality as arm tension is released.
• On completing the movement, the student rolls or shakes her shoulders, noticing the relaxation.

VARIATIONS

• Take more than one complete breath in each position of activation.
• While activating, reach up to further open the diaphragm.
• This can be done sitting, standing, or lying down.
• Arm Activations can be done in different arm positions (e.g., arm straight ahead, next to hip, behind the waist).

ACTIVATES THE BRAIN FOR

• expressive speech and language ability
• relaxed use of diaphragm and increased respiration
• eye-hand coordination and the manipulation of tools

ACADEMIC SKILLS

• penmanship and cursive writing
• creative writing

RELATED SKILLS

• operating machines (e.g., a word processor)

BEHAVIOURAL/POSTURAL CORRELATES

• an increased attention span for written work
• improved focus and concentration without overfocus
• improved breathing and a relaxed attitude
• an enhanced ability to express ideas
• increased energy in hands and fingers (relaxes writer’s cramp)

Brain Gym Dublin 085-1445494

Don’t forget to share if you like this post ;)

Improved breathing and a relaxed attitude.

 

ARM ACTIVATION

Arm Activation is an isometric self-help activity which lengthens the muscles of the upper chest and shoulders. Muscular control for both gross-motor and fine-motor activities originates in this area. If these muscles are shortened from tension, activities related to writing and the control of tools are inhibited.

TEACHING TIPS

• The student experiences her arms as they hang loosely at her sides.

• The student activates one arm as illustrated, while keeping her head relaxed. She then compares the two arms in terms of length, relaxation, and flexibility, before activating the other arm.

• Activation is done in four positions: away from the head, forward, backward, and toward the ear.

• The student may feel the arm activation all the way down to the ribcage.

• The student exhales on the activation, releasing the breath over eight or more counts.

• The student may notice increased relaxation, coordination, and vitality as arm tension is released.

• On completing the movement, the student rolls or shakes her shoulders, noticing the relaxation.

VARIATIONS

• Take more than one complete breath in each position of activation.

• While activating, reach up to further open the diaphragm.

• This can be done sitting, standing, or lying down.

• Arm Activations can be done in different arm positions (e.g., arm straight ahead, next to hip, behind the waist).

ACTIVATES THE BRAIN FOR

• expressive speech and language ability

• relaxed use of diaphragm and increased respiration

• eye-hand coordination and the manipulation of tools

ACADEMIC SKILLS

• penmanship and cursive writing

• creative writing

RELATED SKILLS

• operating machines (e.g., a word processor)

BEHAVIOURAL/POSTURAL CORRELATES

• an increased attention span for written work

• improved focus and concentration without overfocus

• improved breathing and a relaxed attitude

• an enhanced ability to express ideas

• increased energy in hands and fingers (relaxes writer’s cramp)

Don’t forget to share if you like this post ;)

Phone : Brain Gym Dublin 085-1445494

email: braingymdublin@gmail.com