What is dyslexia?

What is dyslexia?

Dyslexia has been around for a long time and has been defined in different ways. For example, in 1968, the World Federation of Neurologists defined dyslexia as “a disorder in children who, despite conventional classroom experience, fail to attain the language skills of reading, writing, and spelling commensurate with their intellectual abilities.

What are the different types of dyslexia?

There are several types of dyslexia that can affect the child’s ability to spell as well as read.

  1. Trauma dyslexia usually occurs after some form of brain trauma or injury to the area of the brain that controls reading and writing. It is rarely seen in today’s school-age population.
  2. Primary dyslexia. This type of dyslexia is a dysfunction of, rather than damage to, the left side of the brain (cerebral cortex) and does not change with age. Individuals with this type are rarely able to read above a fourth-grade level and may struggle with reading, spelling, and writing as adults. Primary dyslexia is passed in family lines through their genes (hereditary). It is found more often in boys than in girls.
  3. Secondary developmental dyslexia is felt to be caused by hormonal development during the early stages of fetal development. Developmental dyslexia diminishes as the child matures. It is also more common in boys.
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One thought on “What is dyslexia?

  1. Hi, thanks for liking my post! What a shame you are half way around the world. I would love to get my son tested for Dyslexia just to make sure we aren’t also dealing with that as well as his ADHD, ODD and Anxiety Disorder. We have a cousin who has Primary dyslexia, and I wouldn’t be surprised if my Mother in law has it too, but undiagnosed. I must search out someone like you in Australia just to make sure we aren’t fighting the wrong battles with my son’s aversion to writing!

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